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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    take my turn / walks of life

    Dear teachers,


    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences from an English text?
    I also take my turn at advising our clients when I am needed. I enjoy the personal contact with them as they come form all walks of life and are all ages.


    take turn = do something in turns


    walk of life = an occupation, profession, or social class, walk = line of work


    Thank you again for your kindness.


    Regards,


    V.

  2. #2
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    Re: take my turn / walks of life

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,


    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with the interpretation of the expression in bold in the following sentences from an English text?
    I also take my turn at advising our clients when I am needed. I enjoy the personal contact with them as they come from all walks of life and are all ages.


    take turn = do something in turns


    walk of life = an occupation, profession, or social class, walk = line of work


    Thank you again for your kindness.


    Regards,


    V.
    Yes, your use of these expressions is correct. I wouldn't, however, limit "walk" as in "walks of life" to "line of work". The phrase "walks of life" more generally refers to "backgrounds", which would, of course, include work. The term "social class" accounts for "background" or information other than one's work when speaking of "walks of life", as I understand it.

    Additional explanation

    For example, one could be an artist or a writer, but it wouldn't mean that one of these would be one's means of earning an income. As well, I wouldn't refer to writers or artists as being part of a social class, but I would still apply the expression "walks of life" in the case of artists or writers. I think it's possible to take the expression "walks of life" a little further than the the limitations placed on its definition by the American Heritage Dictionary.

    Heinle's Newbury House Dictionary of American English This dictionary refers to "walks of life" as "positions in society", which I would say allows for more flexibility when considering the phrase "walks of life".

    I would look in more than one dictionary to study and learn expressions. The MacMillan Dictionary lists "backgrounds" before "jobs", for example, in its definition: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/american/walk_29#from-all-walks-of-life.

    Here are some links to dictionaries:

    American Heritage Dictionary
    Cambridge ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary Pictures
    Heinle's ESL Dictionary\
    Macmillan ESL Dictionary
    HyperDictionary

    You could do a search for Merriam-Webster's online dictionary as well. I don't really care very much for the format of this online dictionary, however, which is why I haven't included it here.


    Last edited by PROESL; 21-Jul-2009 at 16:28. Reason: I typed "a" by mistake. I noticed two more typographical errors.

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