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  1. #1
    donmoo Guest

    Default "As a result of" phrase rules

    I would love it if someone could help end a debate that we are having in my home and at work. Can the phrase, "As a result," stand on its own merit at the beginning of a sentence? Does it need an explicit object stated in the sentence that it appear in, or can it refer to an action in the preceding sentence? Here is the specific example:

    "We increased throughput 300 pieces per hour. As a result, we can now process 4200 pieces during a 4 hour span."

    Is there a rule being broken here? The readability can be improved by simply combining the sentences:

    "As a result of increasing throughput 300 pieces per hour, we can now process 4200 pieces during a 4 hour span."

    I have eliminated some of the awkwardness, but our main debate concerns RULES. Can "as a result" refer to the preceding sentence, or must it be combined with an object in the same sentence to be grammatically correct? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "As a result of" phrase rules

    Quote Originally Posted by donmoo View Post
    "We increased throughput 300 pieces per hour. As a result, we can now process 4200 pieces during a 4 hour span."
    This is good English. There is nothing wrong with it.

    I mean the "As a result" part. (It's not clear whether you mean you increased it by 300 pieces or to 300 pieces. It might be clear where you come from. I guess it's 'by'. Also, '4,200' and 'four-hour span' would seem more standard to me.)

    Is there a rule being broken here? No, not in the structure you're referring to.
    The readability can be improved by simply combining the sentences:
    I disagree. The first version seems more readable to me. Two short sentences are usually more readable than one long one - as long as they are meaningful, which this pair is.

    "As a result of increasing throughput 300 pieces per hour, we can now process 4200 pieces during a 4 hour span."
    R.

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