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  1. #1
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    Default the more + the more

    I found the following sentence on the internet.
    The syntax is grammatically correct?

    However, the images tend to fade the longer they remain blind.

    I think it shall be "However, the more the images tend to fade, the longer they remain blind."

    I have not heard that in "the more ~ the more" structure, one of the comparatives can be left out.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: the more + the more

    Quote Originally Posted by yun View Post
    I found the following sentence on the internet.
    The syntax is grammatically correct?

    However, the images tend to fade the longer they remain blind.

    I think it shall be "However, the more the images tend to fade, the longer they remain blind."

    I have not heard that in "the more ~ the more" structure, one of the comparatives can be left out.

    Both forms are valid. It's perfectly OK to say "I get browner, the longer I stay in the sun", as well as the slightly less colloquial and more formal, "The longer I stay out in the sun, the more brown I get".

    Notice that in the second case the 'cause' comes before the 'effect'.

    If you're going to use both comparatives in your example, you also need to switch them around: "However, the longer they remain blind, the more the images tend to fade".

    This has quite a different meaning from "However, the more the images tend to fade, the longer they remain blind", because you have switched the cause and effect. Blindness is the cause, image fading is the effect; the way you've expressed it doesn't make sense - fading images don't cause the blindness.

    Hope that's helpful


    Jeremy
    Last edited by jeremy.h; 31-Jul-2009 at 22:49.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: the more + the more

    Quote Originally Posted by jeremy.h View Post
    Both forms are valid. It's perfectly OK to say "I get browner, the longer I stay in the sun", as well as the slightly less colloquial and more formal, "The longer I stay out in the sun, the more brown I get".
    Thank you very much for your answer.
    But I still have a question.
    In your example, there are two comparatives at least, though the first doesn't come at the beginning of the sentence.
    According to the syntax of your example, the sentence I picked up shall be rephrased as follows.
    "However, the images tend to fade more, the longer they remain blind."

    I would like to know if the original sentence can be accepted as grammatically correct by a school teacher, apart from the fact that it is understood and commonly used by native speakers.

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