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    what form is "here lies"?

    I am sure i have seen the phrase in English "here lies ..." followed by the name of someone on thier gravestone, grave, etc.

    I donīt find this conjugation of the verb "to lay" anywhere. Is this simply bad English?

    thank you for your thoughts.

  2. #2
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    Re: what form is "here lies"?

    Quote Originally Posted by donaldo View Post
    I am sure i have seen the phrase in English "here lies ..." followed by the name of someone on thier gravestone, grave, etc.

    I donīt find this conjugation of the verb "to lay" anywhere. Is this simply bad English?

    thank you for your thoughts.
    This is the verb 'to lie', third person singular he/she/it lies, where does he/she/it lie? He/she/it lies here. Thus, 'here lies....'

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    Re: what form is "here lies"?

    Quote Originally Posted by donaldo View Post
    I am sure i have seen the phrase in English "here lies ..." followed by the name of someone on thier gravestone, grave, etc.

    I donīt find this conjugation of the verb "to lay" anywhere. Is this simply bad English?

    thank you for your thoughts.
    You're not teaching "lay" for "lie" are you?

    Here's a note from merriam-webster:
    lay - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

    Usage:
    Some commentators are ready to abandon the distinction [between lie and lay], suggesting that lay is on the rise socially. But if it does rise to respectability, it is sure to do so slowly: many people have invested effort in learning to keep lie and lay distinct. Remember that even though many people do use lay for lie, others will judge you unfavorably if you do.

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    Re: what form is "here lies"?

    no, iīm not teaching lay for lie, itīs just that i didnīt realize there are two verb with identical spelling but different meanings: "tell a lie" and "lie on the beach."

    but tell me, is there really a difference between "lay down" and "lie down"? when i speak English, i suppose i use them interchangably.

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    Re: what form is "here lies"?

    Quote Originally Posted by donaldo View Post
    no, iīm not teaching lay for lie, itīs just that i didnīt realize there are two verb with identical spelling but different meanings: "tell a lie" and "lie on the beach."

    but tell me, is there really a difference between "lay down" and "lie down"? when i speak English, i suppose i use them interchangably.
    In your first example, the word lie is not a verb, it's a noun. Tell is the verb. Lie is the noun.

    Yes, as previously explained, many many people use lie and lay interchangeably, but there is a difference.

    Lie is an action verb - you lie on your bed, you lie on the beach, you lie to the police (yes, 2 different meanings). You can also lie down on your bed!

    Lay down is something you do to something else - I lay the book down on the table. Please lay down the gun and walk away slowly!

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