Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    bspkumar is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    101
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    I have seen a BBC document which described Albert Einstein as "Passivist".

    The narrator says, Einstein never accepted the modern theories of "quantum mechanics", he beliefs only in his "theory of evrerything".
    Then narrator finally says, "Einstein is a passivist".

    Does passivist mean who does not change the opinions according to the changing situations?

    I have googled the above word but, did not find any appropriate meaning.

    Thank you for your consideration.

  2. #2
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    4,804
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    He probably said "pacifist" because he was against war.

  3. #3
    bspkumar is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Telugu
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    101
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    I know the meaning of the word pacifist: one who belives war is wrong.

    But, they have not discussed about the war throug out the documentary.

    I am clear that the they have used the word "passivist" when describing him as who opposes or does not accept the modern string theory ( quantum mechanics ).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    Quote Originally Posted by bspkumar View Post
    I know the meaning of the word pacifist: one who belives war is wrong.

    But, they have not discussed about the war throug out the documentary.

    I am clear that the they have used the word "passivist" when describing him as who opposes or does not accept the modern string theory ( quantum mechanics ).
    I would say that "passivist", as you heard it, is someone who is passive, meaning they don't openly object to things they find wrong or disagreeable in any way. Some people are more passive than others, but this attitude or behavior can change depending on one's situation.

    Check the dictionaries to get a better idea of this.


    Dictionaries


  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,640
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I would say that "passivist", as you heard it, is someone who is passive, meaning they don't openly object to things they find wrong or disagreeable in any way. Some people are more passive than others, but this attitude or behavior can change depending on one's situation.
    ...
    I have my doubts about this interpretation. There are people who believe in an active intelligence overseeing the universe. Despite his widely-quoted Gott würfelt nicht, it's not thought that Einstein believed in an omniscient/omnipresent/all-seeing intelligent being; he took a passive view of the universe, not actively controlled by anyone/thing, but just continuing to operate according to a Grand Unification Theory yet to be discovered.

    Alternatively, someone with a greater understanding of string theory than I have might think that matter made up of these little vibrating pieces of spaghetti is in some sense 'active'. But what do I know?

    But I'm not entirely committed to this interpretation either. As the OP refers to a narrator saying something, it seems to me that the first reply may have been 'on the money'. I'm not impressed by anyone (even a native speaker) saying 'I know what I heard'.

    b

  6. #6
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,649
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    I have my doubts about this interpretation. There are people who believe in an active intelligence overseeing the universe. Despite his widely-quoted Gott würfelt nicht, it's not thought that Einstein believed in an omniscient/omnipresent/all-seeing intelligent being; he took a passive view of the universe, not actively controlled by anyone/thing, but just continuing to operate according to a Grand Unification Theory yet to be discovered.

    Thankyou Bob, you have put into words that which I struggled to do. Maith fear hein. (Good man yourself)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Meaning of "passivist" in the following context?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I have my doubts about this interpretation. There are people who believe in an active intelligence overseeing the universe. Despite his widely-quoted Gott würfelt nicht, it's not thought that Einstein believed in an omniscient/omnipresent/all-seeing intelligent being; he took a passive view of the universe, not actively controlled by anyone/thing, but just continuing to operate according to a Grand Unification Theory yet to be discovered.

    Alternatively, someone with a greater understanding of string theory than I have might think that matter made up of these little vibrating pieces of spaghetti is in some sense 'active'. But what do I know?

    But I'm not entirely committed to this interpretation either. As the OP refers to a narrator saying something, it seems to me that the first reply may have been 'on the money'. I'm not impressed by anyone (even a native speaker) saying 'I know what I heard'.

    b
    I hear what you're saying. On the other hand, it could be very easy to mistake one of these words for the other in listening and speaking. So that was the hunch I was going on, though, generally, I'm not very sanguine about hunches.


Similar Threads

  1. [Essay] What is CONTEXT?
    By stonecold in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-May-2009, 19:03
  2. [Idiom] Idioms quiz
    By daria28 in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28-Jan-2009, 08:02
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Dec-2008, 05:43
  4. meaning of "anal retentives" in this context?
    By unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 05-Mar-2007, 12:15
  5. UNDERSTAND MEANING...please help
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2005, 04:49

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •