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Thread: Triphthongs

  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Lightbulb Triphthongs

    Hi,
    Can anybody explain the concept of tripthongs?
    And why are they not there in american accent?


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    #2

    Re: Triphthongs

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,
    Can anybody explain the concept of tripthongs?
    And why are they not there in american accent?
    A triphthong is almost the same thing as a diphthong, which is a compound, or double, vowel sound. A diphthong can include one vowel that makes two vowel sounds. Here's an example: site.
    The "i" in "site" sounds like "s-a-i-t". The best thing to do is look up the word here and listen to it: www.answers.com. Just click on the speaker. Another example of a diphthong is the long "o" sound, as in the word "know". The "o" sound in "know" is immediately followed by a quick "u" sound. So the word actually sounds like this: n-o-u, but the "u" sound is quick. Failure to produce diphthong sounds such as this contribute to a foreign accent.

    Another type of diphthong includes two vowel sounds in which the first vowel sound glides into the second vowel sound, as in the word "noise".


    I would look here and here for triphthongs.

    triphthong A vowel sound in which the vocal organs move from one position through a second to a third.

    There are no triphthongs among the English phonemes, but such sounds occur when a closing diphthong is followed by /ə/. At least, they theoretically occur in a careful pronunciation of such words as player ...

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