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Thread: Not to mention

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    #1

    Not to mention

    What does 'not to mention' mean? How do I use it properly in a sentence? Should it be followed by a noun, verb or gerund? Thanks.
    Last edited by st_hart; 03-Aug-2009 at 11:46.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: Not to mention

    Quote Originally Posted by st_hart View Post
    What does 'not to mention' mean? How do I use it properly in a sentence? Is it should be followed by a noun, verb or gerund? Thanks.
    Not to mention is an Idiom: meaning Much less - used as an adverb to add emphasis to what you are saying

    • The boy hasn't learnt arithmetic, not to mention algebra. ( Here you want to emphasize that the boy is poor in all ereas of mathematics,not to mention algebra is an adverbial phrase )
    • she can't boil potatoes, not to mention cooking a meal. (To emphasize that she does not know ABC of cooking, the under lined portion is an adverbial phrase)

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    #3

    Re: Not to mention

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    • she can't boil potatoes, not to mention cooking a meal. (To emphasize that she does not know ABC of cooking, the under lined portion is an adverbial phrase)
    In that case, can we assume that the phrase following the 'not to mention' is harder, more difficult or has a higher degree than the phrase before the idiom?

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: Not to mention

    Quote Originally Posted by st_hart View Post
    In that case, can we assume that the phrase following the 'not to mention' is harder, more difficult or has a higher degree than the phrase before the idiom?
    Yes it should mean like that. Cooking a meal is certainly much more difficult than boiling egg.

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    #5

    Re: Not to mention

    That's clear. Thanks :)

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