Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    adel87 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Algeria
      • Current Location:
      • Algeria
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    173
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile ask for information

    dear sir in this sentence
    sentinel 's sweeping in quick.
    i don't find sweeping as noun
    please what is his type and meaning

    thank you

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    18,252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by adel87 View Post
    dear sir in this sentence
    sentinel 's sweeping in quick.
    i don't find sweeping as noun
    please what is his type and meaning

    thank you
    If your sentence is: "Sentinel's sweeping in quick" i.e. "Sentinel is sweeping in quick", then sweeping is the present participle in the present progressive tense.

  3. #3
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    21,648
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    If your sentence is: "Sentinel's sweeping in quick" i.e. "Sentinel is sweeping in quick", then sweeping is the present participle in the present progressive tense.
    What does "Sentinel is sweeping in quick" mean Ray? I looked at this post earlier today and I couldn't understand what it was trying to say. I tried looking at it with the apostrophe as a possessive and that obviously made even less sense, so I didn't answer it.

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    18,252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    What does "Sentinel is sweeping in quick" mean Ray?
    How the hell do I know? I'm just answering the question.
    The OP posted the question, and I'm assuming it means something to them, or they wouldn't have bothered asking.
    If "sentinel 's sweeping in quick." does not mean "Sentinel is sweeping in quick", I expect that the OP would write back and say so. My answer was provisional. "Sentinel" could be the name of a wind, for example. It's sweeping back quickly after having changed direction.


    I looked at this post earlier today and I couldn't understand what it was trying to say. I tried looking at it with the apostrophe as a possessive and that obviously made even less sense, so I didn't answer it.
    And that's your right to choose, whereas in this case, I chose to make a guess.
    If it is meant to read "Sentinel is sweeping in quick", I cannot see that "sweeping" could be anything but a present participle.
    It's obviously one of the constraints of an asynchronous medium that you cannot get immediate feedback. If you ask for clarification, half the time you get no response.
    If adel87 cannot make sense of my answer and wants clarification, s/he knows where I am.

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    21,648
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    And that's your right to choose, whereas in this case, I chose to make a guess.
    If it is meant to read "Sentinel is sweeping in quick", I cannot see that "sweeping" could be anything but a present participle.
    It's obviously one of the constraints of an asynchronous medium that you cannot get immediate feedback. If you ask for clarification, half the time you get no response.
    If adel87 cannot make sense of my answer and wants clarification, s/he knows where I am.
    I wasn't intending to challenge your answer, I asked because I thought that maybe there was a colloquial meaning for "Sentinel is sweeping in quickly" that I didn't know about. You never know.

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    18,252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    You never know.
    Indeed you don't!

  7. #7
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Exclamation Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    What does "Sentinel is sweeping in quick" mean Ray? I looked at this post earlier today and I couldn't understand what it was trying to say. I tried looking at it with the apostrophe as a possessive and that obviously made even less sense, so I didn't answer it.
    Adel has sent a private message to me seekiing clarification and this is what I have replied: The word 'sweeping' is used here not as a noun but verb. It is the "ing" form of the verb sweep. The Sentinel is sweeping in quick means the sweeping motion is rapid. Please try to understand what is sentinel and how it works, as explained below.
    "Sentinels are essentially hovering drones armed with energy weapons called Sentinel Beams which is a Laser-based directed energy weapon The weapon is particularly effective against small flood outbreaks and Energy Shields which are an important piece of technology that protect the users from harm, The drones are equipped with energy weapons which they fire in a sweeping motion. (like a window wiper)"

  8. #8
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    18,252
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Adel has sent a private message to me seekiing clarification and this is what I have replied:
    Are you sure adel wants their private messages posted here? You've given adel the same answer as I have, ie. that "sweeping" is the present participle.
    But thanks for the tip about wasting my time.

  9. #9
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Hello adel87

    To answer your question, the verb sweep means 'to move steadily and strongly or swiftly', and it's usually followed by the word along, down, by, in, into, etc.

    Source


    ________________
    Correction

    Dear Sir and/or Madam

    In the sentence Sentinel's sweeping in quick, I can't find sweeping as noun (in my dictionary). What is its function and meaning?

    Thank you.

  10. #10
    Soup's Avatar
    Soup is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,892
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: ask for information

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    How the hell do I know? I'm just answering the question.

    If you ask for clarification, half the time you get no response.

    If adel87 cannot make sense of my answer and wants clarification, s/he knows where I am.
    If that were the case adel87 would have contacted you instead of sarat_106. You may want to take the time right now to ask yourself why that was and you might just understand why it is that you feel you don't get a response half the time and for that reason seem to feel as if you're wasting your time here. I, for one, don't feel you are wasting your time here. On the contrary, I find your posts insightful as well as contributory.

    Having said that, though, I've noticed that often times the defensive tone of your posts serve more to scare posters off than to invite them to communicate with you in a positive way. I trust you know by now, being an academic yourself--at least that's what is says in your Bio--that in academia, it's not what you say per se that sways your audience, but more so how you say it; moreover, in academia, it's the author's ideas that are challenged, never the author. In challenging the author, not only do we distract the audience from the issue under discussion, but also lose the opportunity to learn and understand what that person has to teach us.

    Having been an on-line teacher for almost 10 years now, my learned advice to you is this. Don't take posts personally; start looking at them from an academic point of view. After all, this is the Ask a Teacher Forum. Posters are expecting to hear learned advice from a educator, one that has the patience and understanding of a professional. Be that.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk