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Thread: Conditional


    • Join Date: Apr 2004
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    #1

    Conditional

    If these are not correct, why? What do they mean?

    1. I guess I would need another engine if I wanted to try and see if my engine is the problem or not?
    2. I guess I would need another engine if I wanted to try and see if my engine was the problem or not?
    3. I guess I would need another engine if I want to try and see if my engine is the problem or not?
    4. I guess I would need another engine if I want to try and see if my engine was the problem or not?

    Do I have one conditional or two for those sentences? I have two "if's" in my sentences, so how do they work?

    Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: Conditional

    If I were you, I would say,

    1- I guess I would need another engine if I wanted to try and see if my engine were the problem.

    2- I guess I need another engine if I want to try and see if my engine is the problem.

    Let's keep an eye on others' replies.


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    #3

    Re: Conditional

    How do these conditionals work? If they're not correct, why? What do they mean?
    1. If you get into an accident, it would be your fault if you were not the right of way person. (If this one is correct, how does 'get' work here? Why doesn't it need to be past tense?)
    2. If you got into an accident, it would be your fault if you were not the right of way person.

    For the ones above, what rules do I follow? I know the rules for the other conditionals.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by jack; 23-Feb-2005 at 04:45.

  1. HCaulfield's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: Conditional

    First of all, I think that blacknomi's reply was right. I'd use the same sentences.

    Regarding your second question, I would go with number 2.

    That is conditional type 2 (right?) and it goes:

    If+simple past (subjunctive, actually)(+then)+conditional.

    The part with were is somewhat tricky because it's part of the first segment, even though it's written in the end:

    If you got into an accident and you if were not the right of way person, it would be your fault.

    or

    If you get into an accident and you are not the right of way person, it will be your fault. (Type 1)
    Last edited by HCaulfield; 23-Feb-2005 at 18:15. Reason: Remark


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    #5

    Re: Conditional

    1. You could have sold it for $5000 if there had not been any engine problems. (With 'hadn't ' here, it only tells you about the engine at the time it was sold right?)

    This is a mixed conditional:
    2. You could have sold it for $5000 if there wasn't any engine problems. (Is this one okay too? It means the engine problems still exist right?)

    For situations like this where mixed conditionals are acceptable, which one would you use? Is it better to stay with the rules?

    Thanks.

  2. HCaulfield's Avatar

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    #6

    Re: Conditional

    To my understanding, 1 is right and yes, had refers to that specific point in time. I don't think 2 is right... it should read:

    You could sell it for $5000 if there weren't any engine problems.


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    #7

    Re: Conditional

    What HCaulfield said.
    It was sold at a lower price. What a shame you lost a chance.
    Last edited by blacknomi; 27-Feb-2005 at 10:17.


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    #8

    Re: Conditional


    This is a mixed conditional:
    2. You could have sold it for $5000 if there wasn't any engine problems. (Is this one okay too? It means the engine problems still exist right?)

    For situations like this where mixed conditionals are acceptable, which one would you use? Is it better to stay with the rules?
    It's a mixed conditional but I don't think it works out in your example. As in HCaulfield's example, the problem and the machine are still there.


    Here's the mixed conditional I can think of now.

    (Jack wants to sell his DC.)
    HCaulfield: When did you buy it?

    Jack: I bought this digital camera three years ago.

    HCaulfield: Three years ago? How far is the price do you think you can go?

    Jack: I honestly don't know. I accidently dropped it when I was taking a picture in front of Eiffel Tower. So it has some problems now. Well, just very little problem I mean...

    HCaulfield: If you hadn't dropped it, you could sell it for $5000 now. I'm sorry! What about $500? I'm in the market for a secondhand.

    Jack: Are you a vampire?


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    #9

    Re: Conditional

    Thanks for the scenario blackmoni.

    What about this:
    1. If the car breaks down on you-- you would have pay for the repair (if you didn't buy the warranty). (If this is incorrect, why?)
    2. If the car breaks down on you, you would have pay for the repair. (Is this incorrect of how it is written?)

    3. If the car breaks down on you, you will have to pay for the repair yourself. (Let's say I'm trying to get someone to buy the warranty, is it better to use #1? #1 is more polite and less forceful? What would you use?)

    For the conditionals above, should I keep them all in one tense?
    Like:
    1. All past tense.
    2. All present tense.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by jack; 28-Feb-2005 at 20:35.

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