Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Observe the following terms:
    guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Are they used in the same sense on colloquial English? For example on:
    a) Hey guy(s), let's do something about it.
    b) Come on dude, cheer up!
    c) Ok fellow(s), I think they're ok now.
    d) Hey ma(e)n, are you ok?
    e) Come on folk(s), it' time to go.
    I am wondering if these terms mean the same on the sentences above and if they can be used in singular and plural.

    Which of them have a femine counterpart? I mean may dude, guy, fellow refer to also to a woman?

    Could ma'am be used as the feminine for man in the colloquial use above, or is it always a formal word?

    Finally regarding folks, I am aware this words has more meanings, but which of them are more common? For example in the sentence:
    My folks are coming for a visit
    What would say folks mean here? Someone's parents, someone's relatives or someone's friends? Or does it really depend on the context?

    P.S.: Feel free to correct any mistakes on this post.

  2. #2
    julianna's Avatar
    julianna is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Algeria
      • Current Location:
      • Algeria
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    283
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    thank you so much, i really need this american words,, but can you tell me pleas what does 'cheer up'' mean?
    and whats the meaning of folks and fellow and ma'am ?
    does dude mean 'my father'? and do you have some otherwords? if so; please give them to me

  3. #3
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Well julianna, that is kind of what I am asking, but, let me try to answer you:

    Cheer up is an expression used to "put someon up". When someone is down, sad, depressed, you may use it, in the sense of: Come on, be happy !!

    Dude does not mean father, I think it is an AmE expression, maybe a slang, used to say "friend", "fellow", "colleague".

    Well let us wait for the expert's answers.

    P.S.: Feel free to correct any mistakes on this post.

  4. #4
    julianna's Avatar
    julianna is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Algeria
      • Current Location:
      • Algeria
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    283
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    ok thanks so much dear; i am waiting for the experts answers, thanks again

  5. #5
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Quote Originally Posted by julianna View Post
    whats the meaning of folks and fellow and ma'am ?
    Ma'am stands for the way they pronounce quickly 'madam' - a word which comes from french and means something like "my lady". I guess it is the feminine of sir (not used as a title) or gentleman.
    Regarding folks see my first post above.

    But wait, this is part of the question I am asking.

  6. #6
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    1,512
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    I have found another two similar words:

    'lad' and 'chap'

    I think these two are more used on BrE. But I really would like someone to confirm. Are they used with the same meaning of the origianal ones 'guy, dude, fellow, man, folk'? Do they have a feminine counterpart or are they used for both genres.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Observe the following terms:
    guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Are they used in the same sense on colloquial English? For example on:
    a) Hey guy(s), let's do something about it.
    b) Come on dude, cheer up!
    c) Ok fellow(s), I think they're ok now.
    d) Hey ma(e)n, are you ok?
    e) Come on folk(s), it' time to go.
    I am wondering if these terms mean the same on the sentences above and if they can be used in singular and plural.

    Which of them have a femine counterpart? I mean may dude, guy, fellow refer to also to a woman?

    Could ma'am be used as the feminine for man in the colloquial use above, or is it always a formal word?

    Finally regarding folks, I am aware this words has more meanings, but which of them are more common? For example in the sentence:
    My folks are coming for a visit
    What would say folks mean here? Someone's parents, someone's relatives or someone's friends? Or does it really depend on the context?

    P.S.: Feel free to correct any mistakes on this post.

    a) Hey guy(s), let's do something about it. - The plural form would be typical in this particular sentence, but the singular is also possible.

    b) Come on dude, cheer up! - This is correct. You could use the plural form too.

    c) Ok fellow(s), I think they're ok now. The plural form would be typical in this particular sentence. The colloquial pronunciation is often used for informal situations "fellas".

    d) Hey ma(e)n, are you ok? - If you're talking about the collquial "hey man", just use the singular form. The plural is possible, but it wouldn't be understood in the same way as the colloquial "hey man".

    e) Come on folk(s), it' time to go. - I would just stick to the plural here - folks.

    All these terms are colloquial, and their uses are very circumstantial and have much to do with a speaker's preference and personality.



    Which of them have a femine counterpart? I mean may dude, guy, fellow refer to also to a woman? None of them have a feminine counterpart. People often use "guys" - plural - for both men and women, oddly enough. By the way, it's okay to use "none" as a plural. We can talk about that later if you want.

    Could ma'am be used as the feminine for man in the colloquial use above, or is it always a formal word? - It's always formal.

    Finally regarding folks, I am aware this word has more meanings, but which of them are more common? For example in the sentence: My folks are coming for a visit. - That's a common use of folks.

    What would say folks mean here? Someone's parents, someone's relatives or someone's friends? Or does it really depend on the context? - In that context "folks" mean "parents".

    I would go to Cambridge Dictionaries to observe the ways in which "folks" can be used, and then post questions from there.

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    I'd check other dictionaries as well if you're really curious.



    Dictionaries
    Last edited by PROESL; 19-Aug-2009 at 21:06.

  8. #8
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Cool Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Hi,

    If I am not wrong..
    Folks is American
    Bloke is Australian
    Mate is British....

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    If I am not wrong..
    Folks is American
    Bloke is Australian
    Mate is British....
    I think they use "bloke" in British English as well.


  10. #10
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    23,074
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: guy, dude, fellow, man, folk

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I think they use "bloke" in British English as well.

    Yes we do. Australians also use 'mate', probably even more than the British do.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Fellow
    By grazza in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Mar-2007, 09:35
  2. fellow passengers
    By Hanka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 19-Nov-2006, 19:47
  3. dude!??
    By wml in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 09-May-2006, 22:32
  4. should old folk send to old folk house?
    By shreky87 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 11-May-2005, 08:32

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •