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  1. #1
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    I beg your pardon.

    I was wondering, what is the grammatical structure of this sentence
    I beg your pardon ?

    I know we use it when we misundertand someone, or do not hear well,
    meaning something like: "I did not understant, could you repeat please?"
    Or it may also be used to apologize. Besides these two situations, where else could it be used?

    But is the original sentence truly a question? (I beg your pardon?)
    Is it a request?
    Where does this expression come from?

    P.S.: Feel free to correct any possible mistakes of mine on this post.

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    "I beg your pardon?" is put in question form, but it is not really a question. It is like "Excuse me!"


  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I was wondering, what is the grammatical structure of this sentence
    I beg your pardon ?

    I know we use it when we misundertand someone, or do not hear well,
    meaning something like: "I did not understant, could you repeat please?"
    Or it may also be used to apologize. Besides these two situations, where else could it be used?

    But is the original sentence truly a question? (I beg your pardon?)
    Is it a request?
    Where does this expression come from?

    P.S.: Feel free to correct any possible mistakes of mine on this post.
    "I beg your pardon" derives from "I beg you to pardon me for misunderstanding/mis-hearing you. (But would you repeat it)"

    It is also used when children (or adults) use swear words, or are being insulting.
    "I beg your pardon!" = "I beg you to pardon me for perhaps misunderstanding you. (But are you using naughty words? / But are you insulting me?)"

    It can also be used as an apology.
    "Oh, I beg your pardon!" = "I beg you to pardon me for stepping on your foot. I didn't mean to".

    "Pardon?" is used for the first two situations. "Pardon me" for the last one.

  4. #4
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Thanks Raymott and RonBee. Very instructive answers.

    Well, from your answers I infer that "I beg your pardon!" is definitely not a question. One cannot use the interrogation mark (?) after it in any situation.

    On the other hand, only "Pardon?" or "Pardon me?" could be (and must be)
    considered as questions.

    Right?

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Thanks Raymott and RonBee. Very instructive answers.

    Well, from your answers I infer that "I beg your pardon!" is definitely not a question. One cannot use the interrogation mark (?) after it in any situation.

    On the other hand, only "Pardon?" or "Pardon me?" could be (and must be)
    considered as questions.

    Right?
    I think it depends on exactly what it is that makes something a question.
    "Please pardon me" is grammatically an imperative.
    "Would you pardon me?" is a question.
    "I want you to pardon me" is declarative.
    "Pardon me (?)" could have any or all of those meanings.
    To me, it seems to matter only in writing, when you are deciding whether to put a question mark after it or not.

  6. #6
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I think it depends on exactly what it is that makes something a question.
    "Please pardon me" is grammatically an imperative.
    "Would you pardon me?" is a question.
    "I want you to pardon me" is declarative.
    "Pardon me (?)" could have any or all of those meanings.
    To me, it seems to matter only in writing, when you are deciding whether to put a question mark after it or not.

    I understand what you say Raymott, and I agree. Actually I had already understood on your first post. But what I had asked for a confirmation was
    the following:

    On written English, the expression "I beg your pardon" (I mean exactly that way, with all its letters and no one more) is not a question. Although the speaker may pronounce it as a question, one should never write it with a question mark.

    I think I am convinced on the veracity of the affirmative above, but I just asked for a confirmation.


    P.S.1: Thanks for the declarative, I did not know that term. So we may have declarative, affirmative, imperative and interrogative sentences (or clauses?) ? Are there other possibilities?

    P.S.2: Please feel free to correct any mistakes on this post.

  7. #7
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I understand what you say Raymott, and I agree. Actually I had already understood on your first post. But what I had asked for a confirmation was
    the following:

    On written English, the expression "I beg your pardon" (I mean exactly that way, with all its letters and no one more) is not a question. Although the speaker may pronounce it as a question, one should never write it with a question mark.

    I think I am convinced on the veracity of the affirmative above, but I just asked for a confirmation.


    P.S.1: Thanks for the declarative, I did not know that term. So we may have declarative, affirmative, imperative and interrogative sentences (or clauses?) ? Are there other possibilities?

    P.S.2: Please feel free to correct any mistakes on this post.
    I would use a question mark if the sentence had the effect of a question - that is, in the first two of the three contexts I gave in #3.
    I beg your pardon?
    But I should warn you that I use question marks in places where others might not, eg:
    Perhaps you are trying to trick me?
    I think the answer still has to be: How do you conceptualise a question?
    >I think it depends on exactly what it is that makes something a question.

    PS:
    'Declarative' and 'affirmative' would refer to the same kind of sentences, just as 'interrogative' and 'question' do. I was simply indicating that the sentences were of a different type.

  8. #8
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    Re: I beg your pardon.

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I would use a question mark if the sentence had the effect of a question - that is, in the first two of the three contexts I gave in #3.
    I beg your pardon?
    But I should warn you that I use question marks in places where others might not, eg:
    Perhaps you are trying to trick me?
    I think the answer still has to be: How do you conceptualise a question?
    >I think it depends on exactly what it is that makes something a question.

    PS:
    'Declarative' and 'affirmative' would refer to the same kind of sentences, just as 'interrogative' and 'question' do. I was simply indicating that the sentences were of a different type.
    Thanks Raymott, your answer and opinions were very important to me.

  9. #9
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    Re: I beg your pardon. - And I beg yours !!!

    In the movie "All the King's" someone answered
    "And I beg yours."
    to the direct request/question "I beg your pardon?"

    What is that supposed to mean?

  10. #10
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    Re: I beg your pardon. - And I beg yours !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    In the movie "All the King's" someone answered
    "And I beg yours."
    to the direct request/question "I beg your pardon?"

    What is that supposed to mean?
    I beg your pardon also. (I think you mean All the King's Men.)

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