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  1. #1
    krandig is offline Newbie
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    Default "Midst of a rash"

    What does "in the midst of a rash" mean?
    Thanks a bunch.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "Midst of a rash"

    Quote Originally Posted by krandig View Post
    What does "in the midst of a rash" mean?
    Thanks a bunch.
    Sorry, I have never heard of it.

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: "Midst of a rash"

    Quote Originally Posted by krandig View Post
    What does "in the midst of a rash" mean?
    Thanks a bunch.
    Like bhaisahab, I haven't heard this used. However, if I did hear it, here's how I'd start to interpret it (I say 'start' because you can't fully interpret something without context).

    A rash is a scattered occurrence of something unwelcome. Originally it referred to a medical sign; here's a rash in this physical sense: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._17th_dose.JPG
    But there is a perhaps more widely used metaphorical use; there could, for example, be 'a rash of burglaries'; this is nothing to do with itchy criminals.

    Returning to your question, something might happen 'in the midst' [=right in the middle] of this kind of rash. So that in a possible TV crime drama a detective might say to a sceptical colleague:

    There has been an outbreak of dozens of crimes using exactly the same MO [=modus operandi='way of working']. And you're asking me to believe that the latest burglary - the same sort of target, the same MO, the same ... everything - ... that in the midst of a rash of similar break-ins, this one heist was pulled off by a new 'perp' [=perpetrator, culprit]? I don't buy it.

    b

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