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  1. #1
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    Default teaching spoken english in China

    i've had little experience in teaching, aside from a few tutoring sessions i pretty much register a goose egg on the teaching scale. so i'm wondering if anyone's got any tips for me on how to approach teaching spoken english in China. (chinese students are usually shy and it can be difficult to get them start talking)

    i'll be going back for a 3rd interview with this english school soon and have to come up with a sample class. so basically i want to know if there's any appropriate lesson plans that are entertaining and will get the students to start talking.

    if you've been an english teacher in china and can give me some advice then it'll be greatly appreciated.

    thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Lady Hawk is offline Member
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    Smile Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Quote Originally Posted by john dough View Post
    i've had little experience in teaching, aside from a few tutoring sessions i pretty much register a goose egg on the teaching scale. so i'm wondering if anyone's got any tips for me on how to approach teaching spoken english in China. (chinese students are usually shy and it can be difficult to get them start talking)

    i'll be going back for a 3rd interview with this english school soon and have to come up with a sample class. so basically i want to know if there's any appropriate lesson plans that are entertaining and will get the students to start talking.

    if you've been an english teacher in china and can give me some advice then it'll be greatly appreciated.

    thanks in advance.
    Mr. Dough,

    I was fortunate to have taught for three years in the Japanese Middle School system during my husband's assignment at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It was the most memorable of my life. However, as with any new culture, there was more beneath the surface that would present me with some of the most difficult challenges of my life.

    Will you be in a rural or a suburban area? Will there be other Americans with you? Also, do you speak the language? Whether you do or not, that will be another challenge to you. Language is the door to a country's culture. Naturally, the more you learn, the more you will understand about what goes on around you. Until then, you will have to be very observant.

    If you could give me a little background, I'm sure I could share some very insightful details that would prepare you for the Asian culture. I realize that China isn't Japan (although Americans seem to throw everyone in the same pot). Also, I could help you get going on your lessons as well.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    hi Lady Hawk,

    to answer your questions...i'm actually Chinese myself, so the cultural difference isn't a problem and the language barrier doesn't exist either. I live in a city where the population is approximately 3 million... I had spent 15+ years in the States and have been in China since last winter. There're literally thousands of English language schools over here but the one area that's lacking is spoken english since most of the Chinese teachers are only adept at teaching grammar and writing...and the foreign teachers basically only go for the schools in bigger cities like Beijing and Shanghai for a higher salary....so i thought it'd be a good idea for me to fill that void.

    thanks again

  4. #4
    Lady Hawk is offline Member
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Well, the major hurdles have been covered! Now, all you need is a lesson plan. I suppose I should ask how much English are your students expected to understand, and what is the age group? The first thing you want to start with is what we call an "Ice-Breaker", something fun that will put your students at ease with you. Then, self-introduction. Encourage them to ask you questions. After that, have them practice self introduction with a partner. Just the basic greeting-hello, my name is X. Nice to meet- you will suffice.

    I expect that you will be given teaching material? I would hate to think that you would be expected to develop lessons by yourself, especially when you've never taught.

    If that's the case, let me know and maybe we can work something out. I would like to start an English conversation business over the Internet using the webcam.

    PM me for contact info. It's easier to email than to come here for heavier discussions.
    Last edited by Lady Hawk; 27-Aug-2009 at 04:52. Reason: remove email address

  5. #5
    Reb88 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Hi Lady Hawk,

    I'm also in the same situation as the opening poster. I have my first classes tomorrow and have essentially been told today that there is no curriculum or materials provided. Any advice would be greatly appreciated as this is my first TEFL job!

    I'm teaching Primary and Kindergarten and the english levels are between basic and none. From what i've gathered basic words like hello is the standard.

    Thanks

  6. #6
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    If you want to be a successful EFL teacher in China you should know how to play the guitar!

    Spoken English (oral English) is taught by white monkeys (foreign entertainers). There is no set curriculum. The text books are for memorizing set phrases. (Useless)

    If you want the lowdown :

    China Holistic English

    http://middlekingdomloife.com

    Usually, white people only need apply.
    http://middlekingdomlife.com/wp/chin...tive-speakers/
    Last edited by MW; 04-Sep-2009 at 03:37. Reason: add link

  7. #7
    Anne-Marie is offline Newbie
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    Smile Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Hi John,
    Welcome on board. I'm a fully qualified ESL teacher in Australia with many years experience. I've taught at secondary and tertiary levels, from beginners to advanced to teenagers, young adults, refugees, migrants and international students. Most of my students have been from Southeast Asia and lots from China, Hong Kong and mainland China.
    You're right about not finding much material on teaching spoken English.
    I don't know what age group your students are nor what level, beginner or what? This all makes a difference.
    The good thing is you share the language and culture because both go hand in hand. If you teach spoken language you have teach culture. Let me explain. For instance, you could start with teaching greeting in American English and get your students to compare it with their native usage. Greeting in English is different to greeting in Mandarin or Cantonese for instance. Explore the different ways of greetings depending on whom you meet: a friend, acquaintance, relative, colleague or your boss. And where you meet: in the corridor, at school, in a cafe, on public transport, at someone's place, etc. Do you get the idea? Greeting requires simple grammar but has a complex cultural undertone, that's why spoken language is intertwined with culture. Discuss it in the students' native language but write the different English greetings on the board. Then get the students to role-play the various English greetings. I know role-play is not used in China but I had some colleagues from Australia who taught EFL in China and have used role-plays successfully. So you could give it a try.
    eslandcateaching.wordpress.com
    You could also check out the site below for more ideas.
    Or let me know how you go and I can give you more ideas.
    Good luck
    Anne-Marie

  8. #8
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Hi John,

    As an English teacher in China, your Chinese face will be a major disadvantage. Many students won't trust you in the first place. Some of them may even test your English with the only English slang they know.

    If your pronunciation is imperfect (on the assumption that you came to USA after 12 year old), the students will question your overall English ability, or your capability to teaching English.

    And Chinese students are crazy about word spellings. They'll interrupt you frequently to ask how to spell one word or another. Become a super speller before you embark.

    As you may already know, Chinese students like asking embarrassing questions especially those about your personal life.

    I am sorry if you feel discouraged, but they are the truth. I am a Chinese, too.
    Last edited by BonaVista; 17-Sep-2009 at 20:59.

  9. #9
    deadalud888 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Quote Originally Posted by Lady Hawk View Post
    Mr. Dough,

    I was fortunate to have taught for three years in the Japanese Middle School system during my husband's assignment at Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. It was the most memorable of my life. However, as with any new culture, there was more beneath the surface that would present me with some of the most difficult challenges of my life.

    Will you be in a rural or a suburban area? Will there be other Americans with you? Also, do you speak the language? Whether you do or not, that will be another challenge to you. Language is the door to a country's culture. Naturally, the more you learn, the more you will understand about what goes on around you. Until then, you will have to be very observant.

    If you could give me a little background, I'm sure I could share some very insightful details that would prepare you for the Asian culture. I realize that China isn't Japan (although Americans seem to throw everyone in the same pot). Also, I could help you get going on your lessons as well.


    Deadalus888
    Hi. Can any one help me. I am a British Teacher of Design & Technology for 10 years in the uk and I would like to teach (Just Spoken English in China).

    My problem is that I am very Dyslixic and I am Black. Dose any one have any ideas?

  10. #10
    iZicci's Avatar
    iZicci is offline Junior Member
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    Smile Re: teaching spoken english in China

    Quote Originally Posted by deadalud888 View Post
    Deadalus888
    Hi. Can any one help me. I am a British Teacher of Design & Technology for 10 years in the uk and I would like to teach (Just Spoken English in China).

    My problem is that I am very Dyslixic and I am Black. Dose any one have any ideas?
    Hi, glad to know you!

    Did you mean that you wanna teach oral English in China?

    That's great!

    I want to be your first student.

    How can we keep in touch with each other?

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