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  1. #1
    beachboy's Avatar
    beachboy is offline Senior Member
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    Default to get a kick out of

    I get a kick out of playing soccer on Sundays
    Can I use this idiom in the sentence above? Ive read it means to have fun doing something people disaprove of...

  2. #2
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    Default Re: to get a kick out of

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    I get a kick out of playing soccer on Sundays
    Can I use this idiom in the sentence above? Ive read it means to have fun doing something people disaprove of...
    I wouldn't use it like that - the way it is in your sentence. It's hard to think of examples, so I'll just go here: "really get a kick out of" - Google Search

    This expression is not always used in the most flattering or positive way, but it can be. It depends on what one means to say and the context.

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