Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Bulgarian
      • Home Country:
      • Bulgaria
      • Current Location:
      • Bulgaria
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    5,000
    Post Thanks / Like

    foot of my head of the stairs/landing/neat/straight/on draught/tumbler/in line/on lin

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    He took me to the foot of my staircase.
    foot of a staircase = the lower edge of a staircase

    Just at the stroke of seven Miss Amelia showed herself at the head of the stairs.

    He had reached the first landing when he heard a door above him open and quick, stealthy footsteps descending.
    landing = an intermediate platform on a flight of stairs

    I had to tell someone: and taking the stairs two at a time, I pounded on Holly’s door.
    take the stairs two at a time = take the stairs two steps at a time

    Do you drink vodka neat or you mix it with some juice?

    Do you drink vodka straight or you mix it with some juice?
    neat = straight = without water

    We sell wine on draught.
    on draught = so as to be drawn from the wood (as a cask, barrel, etc.) in distinction from being bottled

    He poured wine into two tumblers and handed one to Humphrey.
    tumbler = a glass with a flat bottom but no handle or stem ; originally had a round bottom

    He drank a glass of ice water down in one long draught.
    in one long draught = all in a long breath, without stopping for breath

    At a movie house I waited in line recently for a ticket.
    in line for = next in order for

    Suddenly, when I was just a few places from the ticket-seller’s window, two young men walked up to the head of the line and tried to buy their tickets immediately.
    in the head of the line = in front of the line

    An argument broke out around us. “Hey! We’ve been waiting on line. Why don’t you?”
    on line = waiting behind others in a row or queue.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    2,129
    Post Thanks / Like

    Exclamation Re: foot of my head of the stairs/landing/neat/straight/on draught/tumbler/in line/on

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    He took me to the foot of my staircase.
    foot of a staircase = the lower edge of a staircase
    from the ground= lowest step of the ground


    Just at the stroke of seven Miss Amelia showed herself at the head of the stairs.
    = the wall in front of the landing or the facing wall as you reach uppermost step

    He had reached the first landing when he heard a door above him open and quick, stealthy footsteps descending.
    landing = an intermediate platform on a flight of stairs
    OK

    I had to tell someone: and taking the stairs two at a time, I pounded on Holly’s door.
    take the stairs two at a time = take the stairs two steps at a time
    OK

    Do you drink vodka neat or you mix it with some juice?

    Do you drink vodka straight or you mix it with some juice?
    neat = straight
    from the bottle = without water OK

    We sell wine on draught.
    on draught = so as to be drawn from the wood (as a cask, barrel, etc.) in distinction from being bottled
    = being drawn from a sturdy wooden cylindrical container (a barrel)meant for storing liquids such as bear, wine etc
    He poured wine into two tumblers and handed one to Humphrey.
    tumbler = a glass with a flat bottom but no handle or stem ; originally had a round bottom
    OK

    He drank a glass of ice water down in one long draught.
    in one long draught = all in a long breath, without stopping for breath
    no idea

    At a movie house I waited in line recently for a ticket.
    in line for = next in order for
    OK

    Suddenly, when I was just a few places from the ticket-seller’s window, two young men walked up to the head of the line and tried to buy their tickets immediately.
    in the head of the line = in front of the line
    OK

    An argument broke out around us. “Hey! We’ve been waiting on
    this line. Why don’t you?”
    on this line = waiting behind others in a row or queue.


    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    All seem Ok except the last one. I think without a demostrative adjective it will mean : we have been waiting on the internet.

  3. #3
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    19,448
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: foot of my head of the stairs/landing/neat/straight/on draught/tumbler/in line/on

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    He took me to the foot of my staircase.
    foot of a staircase = the lower edge of a staircase the point at which the stair starts from the ground/floor

    Just at the stroke of seven Miss Amelia showed herself at the head of the stairs.

    The point at which the stair ends on the way upwards.

    He had reached the first landing when he heard a door above him open and quick, stealthy footsteps descending.
    landing = an intermediate platform on a flight of stairs usually where a staircase turns a corner.

    I had to tell someone: and taking the stairs two at a time, I pounded on Holly’s door.
    take the stairs two at a time = take the stairs two steps at a time

    Do you drink vodka neat or you mix it with some juice?

    Do you drink vodka straight or you mix it with some juice?
    neat = straight = without water

    We sell wine on draught.
    on draught = so as to be drawn from the wood (as a cask, barrel, etc.) in distinction from being bottled

    He poured wine into two tumblers and handed one to Humphrey.
    tumbler = a glass with a flat bottom but no handle or stem ; originally had a round bottom

    He drank a glass of ice water down in one long draught.
    in one long draught = all in a long breath, without stopping for breath

    At a movie house I waited in line recently for a ticket.
    in line for = next in order for in a queue of people

    Suddenly, when I was just a few places from the ticket-seller’s window, two young men walked up to the head of the line and tried to buy their tickets immediately.
    in the head of the line = in front of the line first in a queue

    An argument broke out around us. “Hey! We’ve been waiting on line. Why don’t you?”
    on line = waiting behind others in a row or queue.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    ..

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] set foot in
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Jun-2009, 12:52
  2. [General] I am looking for your expert opinion 2
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-May-2009, 15:12
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15-Feb-2009, 19:08
  4. wag his head = shake his head
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Apr-2008, 12:13
  5. Movement of the head
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2008, 09:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •