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Thread: Hand in Glove

  1. #1
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    Question Hand in Glove

    Hi,

    What is the correct usage of "Hand in Glove".

    How is Hand in Glove and Hand in Hand different?

    Thanks

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    Default Re: Hand in Glove

    'Hand in hand' refers to physical conjunction. People in love often walk hand in hand.

    'Hand in glove' refers to a metaphorical link (often a clandestine one):

    'MI5 allegedly forced Harold Wilson to resign as Prime Minister because he was believed to be hand in glove with the Communist Party.'

    'The Unions are working hand in glove with the managers, and are not operating in the interests of the workforce.'


    (I was toying with an example involving Qaddafi and the Scottish government, but thought that might be 'sailing a bit close to the wind'. )

    b

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    Default Re: Hand in Glove

    Thanks..

    Please tell me are these constructions right?

    You need to work hard on both your sounds and intonation, as both go hand in hand.

    There can be no development without learning, both have a hand in glove relationship.

    Is it right that hand glove has a negative connotation attached to it and would you used to expressive negative associations and the opposite is for hand in hand?

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    Default Re: Hand in Glove

    No. The difference is not primarily positive/negative, it is physical/metaphorical; the metaphorical one is often to do with a secret - perhaps a guilty secret.

    Your first example is unusual; your second doesn't follow my second example at all.

    I don't have time for more.

    b

  5. #5
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    Post Re: Hand in Glove

    The forums idiom bank provides this definition for "Hand in hand"

    Hand in hand
    Hand in hand= work together closely When people in a group, say in an office or in a project, work together with mutual understanding to achieve the target, we say they work hand in hand. There is no lack of co-operation and each synchoranises the activity with that of the...

    Go hand in hand
    If things go hand in hand, they are associated and go together.

    According to which my first example should be correct..

    Other sources

    hand in hand
    1. Lit. holding hands. (*Typically: do something ~ sit ~ walk ∼.) They walked down the street hand in hand. Bob and Mary sat there quietly, hand in hand.
    2. Fig. [of two things] together, one with the other. (*Typically: go ∼.) Cookies and milk seem to go hand in hand. Teenagers and back talk go hand in hand.
    Last edited by anupumh; 23-Aug-2009 at 23:04.

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    Default Re: Hand in Glove

    The forums idiom bank provides this definition for "hand in glove"
    Hand in glove
    If people are hand in glove, they have an extremely close relationship.

    From other sources:
    hand in glove idiom
    On intimate terms, in close association, as in The internist is hand in glove with the surgeon, so you'd better get a second opinion. This metaphoric expression for a close fit was already included in John Ray's 1678 collection of proverbs, when it was put hand and glove.

    hand in glove (with someone)

    Fig. very close to someone. John is really hand in glove with Sally. The teacher and the principal work hand in glove.

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    Default Re: Hand in Glove

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    The forums idiom bank provides this definition for "Hand in hand"

    Hand in hand
    Hand in hand= work together closely When people in a group, say in an office or in a project, work together with mutual understanding to achieve the target, we say they work hand in hand. There is no lack of co-operation and each synchoranises the activity with that of the...

    Go hand in hand
    If things go hand in hand, they are associated and go together.

    According to which my first example should be correct..

    Other sources

    hand in hand
    1. Lit. holding hands. (*Typically: do something ~ sit ~ walk ∼.) They walked down the street hand in hand. Bob and Mary sat there quietly, hand in hand.
    2. Fig. [of two things] together, one with the other. (*Typically: go ∼.) Cookies and milk seem to go hand in hand. Teenagers and back talk go hand in hand.
    Exactly. There must always be an action verb for sense 2: go, work, proceed...

    If the verb is be (state), the meaning is 1.

    That's the way I hear it, Perhaps some other native speaker would like to comment.

    b

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