Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: onto

  1. #1
    Allen165 is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,676
    Post Thanks / Like

    onto

    Which is correct?

    Sport first found its way onto/on to the Community agenda in 1984.

    I think it should be "onto," but I'm not sure.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    1,110
    Post Thanks / Like

    Smile Re: onto

    I disagree, the preposition onto cannot be used in that sentence..
    I think it has to be on to...
    onto is used for the act of physical movement from the place to another..

    The cat jumped onto the table.

    But

    The cat is sitting on the table

    similarly is into

    He moved into the room
    He jumped into the pool

    Let the other teachers provide a more elaborate reply

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    20,225
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: onto

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    Which is correct?

    Sport first found its way onto/on to the Community agenda in 1984.

    I think it should be "onto," but I'm not sure.

    Thanks.
    'onto' is correct.
    You don't have to split this up unless the prepositions mean something different independently.
    You can see this in these sentences:
    The man walked onto the road.
    The man walked past the shop and on to the pub. (He walked on, to the pub. He didn't walk onto the pub).
    Let's move onto the lawn.
    Let's move on to our English lesson.
    (Let's move on, to our English lesson).
    But even here, "Let's move onto our English lesson" could also be correct if the move is conceived that way.

    anupumh is partly correct is saying that 'onto' is used for a change of position or state; but it's also used in other cases. And it doesn't have to be physical.
    Sport wasn't on the agenda. Now it is. Sport moved onto the agenda.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •