Page 1 of 13 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 127

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Business English Idioms

    Let's talk about business English idioms and what they mean.

    Here's the first one: a ballpark figure.

    Can you give us a ballpark figure? Can you give us an estimate?

    Here's another way to use "ballpark".

    Yes, that price is definitely in the ballpark. Let's set up a time to meet so that we can talk about this in more detail.

    ballpark - This refers to a baseball park. If a price, a number, or a quantity is "in the ballpark", it is within one's requirements.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Business English Idioms

    I think it's about time we raised the bar around here.

    raise the bar - raise the standards for good work and acheivement


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Business English Idioms

    I once heard a telemarketing manager say, "Come on, people! Let's turn up the volume here."

    He meant let's start making more phone calls and making some sales.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Business English Idioms

    I can't believe it. Joe really dropped the ball on the New Bridge Electronics deal. I thought it was a sure thing.

    drop the ball - be responsible for a failure, failed effort, or failed attempt

  1. misiania's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 243
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Business English Idioms

    I'm accounts educated so I have one from this department for you.

    'Balance sheet'

    This is the statement containing list of assets, debts, liabilities, provisions, equity, capital etc.
    It also shows/indicates financial position of the business or trader.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Thumbs up Re: Business English Idioms

    bang for the buck

    MEANING:
    value for the money spent


    EXAMPLE:

    We were able to get a big bang for our buck when we advertised on the Internet.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 20,227
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Business English Idioms

    "His handshake is like a wet jellyfish."
    He is weak and indecisive. He's not the type of person you can trust.


  4. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #8

    Thumbs up Re: Business English Idioms

    back-of-the-envelope calculations

    quick calculations; estimates using approximate numbers, instead of exact numbers

    Example: I don't need the exact numbers right now. Just give me some back-of-the-envelope calculations.

  5. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #9

    Thumbs up Re: Business English Idioms

    belt-tightening

    reduction of expenses

    Example: When worldwide demand for software decreased, Microsoft had to do some belt-tightening.

  6. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #10

    Thumbs up Re: Business English Idioms

    (to) compare apples to oranges

    to compare two unlike things; to make an invalid comparison

    Example: Comparing a night at EconoLodge with a night at the Four Seasons is like comparing apples to oranges. One is a budget motel, and the other is a luxury hotel.
    Note: You will also see the related expression "compare apples to apples" which means to compare two things of the same type. This means that you are making a valid comparison, as opposed to when you're comparing apples to oranges.

Page 1 of 13 1 2 3 4 5 11 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Idiom] Idiom Test
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2009, 03:29
  2. A report on business idioms
    By CG-SE in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2008, 16:47
  3. English Education In China
    By Aniu in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2008, 00:55
  4. Business English And Medical English
    By ironpetal in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-Aug-2007, 14:34

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •