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  1. #1
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
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    Lightbulb Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Hi,

    How and in what ways are these different from each other??

    Teacher
    Trainer
    Instructor
    Facilitator
    Coach
    Mentor

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    How and in what ways are these different from each other??

    Teacher
    Trainer
    Instructor
    Facilitator
    Coach
    Mentor

    Thanks
    I think you should add
    Professor
    Guru

    to your list.

    Regarding guru, you may read: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...e-teacher.html
    And regarding language training you may read http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ge...-training.html

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    There's a jargon element here and some happen to be in vogue at a particular time. Before I left the UK, we were being encouraged to refer to students as customers. I agree with what Raymott says about some rigid methods being training in the link above.

    A mentor gives guidance/advice, especially to the inexperienced. Sports have coaches but the term is being used for teaching- I think it's supposed to sound positive and encouraging. Facilitator changes the roles and doesn't have the same power relationship that teacher/student has- it casts them as (near-) equals in the learning process instead of the transmission of knowledge from the learned to the unlearned, though the term never really took off in my experience- a few people used it but it never caught on in the UK.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    There's a jargon element here and some happen to be in vogue at a particular time. Before I left the UK, we were being encouraged to refer to students as customers. I agree with what Raymott says about some rigid methods being training in the link above.

    A mentor gives guidance/advice, especially to the inexperienced. Sports have coaches but the term is being used for teaching- I think it's supposed to sound positive and encouraging. Facilitator changes the roles and doesn't have the same power relationship that teacher/student has- it casts them as (near-) equals in the learning process instead of the transmission of knowledge from the learned to the unlearned, though the term never really took off in my experience- a few people used it but it never caught on in the UK.

  5. #5
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    There's a jargon element here and some happen to be in vogue at a particular time. Before I left the UK, we were being encouraged to refer to students as customers. I agree with what Raymott says about some rigid methods being training in the link above.

    A mentor gives guidance/advice, especially to the inexperienced. Sports have coaches but the term is being used for teaching- I think it's supposed to sound positive and encouraging. Facilitator changes the roles and doesn't have the same power relationship that teacher/student has- it casts them as (near-) equals in the learning process instead of the transmission of knowledge from the learned to the unlearned, though the term never really took off in my experience- a few people used it but it never caught on in the UK.
    How would you explain the difference between a Trainer and a Teacher..??

  6. #6
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    If I may please, I would like to change the original question a little bit. Or rather ask another question to teachers and academics at UsingEnglish about this subject:

    If a student called you by any of the names above, namely
    Teacher
    Trainer
    Instructor
    Facilitator
    Coach
    Mentor
    Professor
    Guru
    Master
    Doctor
    would you feel offended or upset? I am also talking about college level professors - maybe a professor could be offended to be called as a teacher?

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    [/B]would you feel offended or upset? I am also talking about college level professors - maybe a professor could be offended to be called as a teacher?
    Some might, but generally we use names not positions; I'd rather they used my name than called me 'teacher', but some students find that hard to do because that would be rude in their culture.

  8. #8
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    If I may please, I would like to change the original question a little bit. Or rather ask another question to teachers and academics at UsingEnglish about this subject:

    If a student called you by any of the names above, namely
    Teacher
    Trainer
    Instructor
    Facilitator
    Coach
    Mentor
    Professor
    Guru
    Master
    Doctor
    would you feel offended or upset? I am also talking about college level professors - maybe a professor could be offended to be called as a teacher?
    You can't really compare them because they can mean different things in different settings.
    In fact we don't have "college level professors" in Australia. If you're a professor, you work at a university. A university professor can be all those things, but in most cases, they'd rather be researching. Teaching is often an unpleasant chore for which they often have little natural talent. This applies to many academics (PhDs etc.).
    I believe this also applies to Britain.

  9. #9
    Abstract Idea is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You can't really compare them because they can mean different things in different settings.
    In fact we don't have "college level professors" in Australia. If you're a professor, you work at a university. A university professor can be all those things, but in most cases, they'd rather be researching. Teaching is often an unpleasant chore for which they often have little natural talent. This applies to many academics (PhDs etc.).
    I believe this also applies to Britain.
    OK Raymott. That is exactly what I think when I use the term "professor".
    I know often teaching is an unpleasant chore, specially to freshman or sophomore students. One of the things I asked was whether such professor could feel upset for being inadvertently called teacher by a first-year student.

    When I said "college level" I was using the AmE terminology (that is university), you have already told me the difference: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...niversity.html
    I am sorry about the misunderstanding.

  10. #10
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Teaching vs Training Vs Facilitation

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    OK Raymott. That is exactly what I think when I use the term "professor".
    I know often teaching is an unpleasant chore, specially to freshman or sophomore students. One of the things I asked was whether such professor could feel upset for being inadvertently called teacher by a first-year student.

    When I said "college level" I was using the AmE terminology (that is university), you have already told me the difference: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...niversity.html
    I am sorry about the misunderstanding.
    The reality is that no-one would call their professor "teacher" in any English-speaking country I know of.
    Consider Professor John Smith PhD.
    They would call him Professor Smith, Dr. Smith, Professor, Doctor, or John.
    This is usually sorted out in the first class, where he will say something like "You may call me Professor Smith, or Doctor Smith or John - as long as you do it politely - but not Mr. Smith. I worked a long time for that doctorate! <laughter>".
    So, no he generally wouldn't be offended. He'd be vaguely amused and puzzled, depending on his personality, because he may never have heard it before.
    However, if you called him "teacher" in a way that was obviously sarcastic - implying that he wasn't much of a teacher at all, then yes, he would quite rightly be offended. I've never seen this happen.

    PS: In fact, no one at all is called "teacher" that I can think of.
    A school teacher is either 'Sir', 'Miss", Mr Smith, Miss Smith, Mrs Smith. Perhaps in some progressive schools these days, it might be John or Mary.
    (Again, this BrE, AusE usage, which tends to be similar as far as education systems go).

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