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  1. #1
    lele is offline Newbie
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    Default When can "it" be omitted?

    I found this sentence in a newspaper article:

    As has happened with most cancers in the nation’s 40-year war on cancer, progress on glioblastomas has been incremental.

    The subject "it" in "As has happened..." is omitted.

    My question is: Why is the subject "it" omitted? Or when can I leave it out?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
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    Default Re: When can "it" be omitted?

    Quote Originally Posted by lele View Post
    I found this sentence in a newspaper article:

    As has happened with most cancers in the nation’s 40-year war on cancer, progress on glioblastomas has been incremental.

    The subject "it" in "As has happened..." is omitted.

    My question is: Why is the subject "it" omitted? Or when can I leave it out?

    Thanks.
    The word "as" beginning the sentence is a pronoun that means "that'; "which"; or "that which." The word "it" would not -cannot - be the subject of this sentence, which is good English.

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