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  1. #1
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
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    "title" and "entitle"

    Hello

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/01/bo...w/Unger-t.html
    That is why Indyk titled his book "Innocent Abroad."

    Henry Clinton
    He entitled his book The American Rebellion.

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    < title >
    verb
    [+ obj] : to give a name or title to (something) : to call (a book, song, movie, etc.) by a title
    ▪ She titled the book The Story of My Life.
    ▪ a movie titled Gone With the Wind

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    < entitle >
    verb
    [+ obj] 1 : to give a title to (something, such as a book) : TITLE
    ▪ He entitled his book "My Life on Mars."

    1.
    She titled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was titled "Evolution."
    This is a book titled "Evolution."

    2.
    She entitled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was entitled "Evolution."
    This is a book entitled "Evolution."

    Do you think that these sentences are all grammatically correct? Is #1 less formal than #2?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Re: "title" and "entitle"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello

    http://www.nytimes.com/2009/02/01/bo...w/Unger-t.html
    That is why Indyk titled his book "Innocent Abroad."

    Henry Clinton
    He entitled his book The American Rebellion.

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    < title >
    verb
    [+ obj] : to give a name or title to (something) : to call (a book, song, movie, etc.) by a title
    ▪ She titled the book The Story of My Life.
    ▪ a movie titled Gone With the Wind

    Merriam-Webster's Learner's Dictionary
    < entitle >
    verb
    [+ obj] 1 : to give a title to (something, such as a book) : TITLE
    ▪ He entitled his book "My Life on Mars."

    1.
    She titled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was titled "Evolution."
    This is a book titled "Evolution."

    2.
    She entitled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was entitled "Evolution."
    This is a book entitled "Evolution."

    Do you think that these sentences are all grammatically correct? Is #1 less formal than #2?

    Thank you.
    The more typical verb to use to talk about what one decides to call a book is "title". It's correct to use "entitle", as well. One should keep in mind, however, that "entitle" is used in another way, which I would consider more common than the way in which it is used in these sentences.

    entitle: Definition, Synonyms from Answers.com

    I don't think using "entitle" in place of "title" is necessarily more formal. However, I think using "title" to speak of what one calls something, such as a book, is more common than using "entitle".

  3. #3
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "title" and "entitle"

    1.
    She titled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was titled "Evolution."
    This is a book titled "Evolution."

    2.
    She entitled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was entitled "Evolution."
    This is a book entitled "Evolution."

    Can I use "named" instead of titled and entitled?

  4. #4
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    Re: "title" and "entitle"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    1.
    She titled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was titled "Evolution."
    This is a book titled "Evolution."

    2.
    She entitled her new work "Evolution."
    Her new work was entitled "Evolution."
    This is a book entitled "Evolution."

    Can I use "named" instead of titled and entitled?
    It would be correct to do so; however, one might consider that one of the three verbs could sound more appropriate or more natural in one of the three sentences.

  5. #5
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: "title" and "entitle"

    There are three things, and two words to refer to them:

    a) To give a name to (for example, a book)
    b) To have a title (a position of social rank)
    c) To have something by right

    In Br Eng, a and c are entitled; b is still of sufficient significance in British society to merit a word all to itself: 'He has only humble origins, but many of his friends are titled.'

    The US constitution doesn't provide for Earls and Countesses and Baronets. For that reason, presumably, Noah Webster decided that he could simply ignore case b, and reserve separate words for a and c.

    As so often, this simplification has spread to some users of Br. Eng. But most will still refer to a book as being 'entitled <bookname>'.

    b

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