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Thread: Proper Usage

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    Proper Usage

    Can someone give me examples of sentences utilizing abhor and repugnance? I hate dictionary examples -_- Thanks so much .

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Bump my post up . Really need help with this . Still very unclear on this

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bust3rboi View Post
    Can someone give me examples of sentences utilizing abhor and repugnance? I hate dictionary examples -_- Thanks so much .
    Perhaps you misunderstand what a dictionary is for.
    If you don't understand the meanings of these words, you can look them up and find out. Then, when you do understand them, you can write your very own sentences.

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    The French is offline Senior Member
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    Re: Proper Usage

    Hello, I am the French, I am not a teacher,

    but I think the easier way to understand these words it's to tape on your browser for example 'Cambridge Dictionaries Online'.

    You will find what your are looking for like M.Raymott has suggested.

    If you still don't understand we help you to master the meaning.

    Have a nice and sunny day.

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Perhaps you misunderstand what a dictionary is for.
    If you don't understand the meanings of these words, you can look them up and find out. Then, when you do understand them, you can write your very own sentences.
    Was that suppose to be a small-time joke there?There are times when you read definitions from dictionaries and think , how do i use this ? Knowing the definition of a word is one thing but properly using it is another.

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bust3rboi View Post
    Was that suppose to be a small-time joke there?There are times when you read definitions from dictionaries and think , how do i use this ? Knowing the definition of a word is one thing but properly using it is another.
    I think what Raymott is driving at is, if you write some sentences using those words and post them here, then someone will advise you as to whether you are using them correctly or not.

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bust3rboi View Post
    Was that suppose to be a small-time joke there?There are times when you read definitions from dictionaries and think , how do i use this ? Knowing the definition of a word is one thing but properly using it is another.
    I absolutely agree, a word or an idiom cannot be used in every context. The dictionaries do not state the contexts, they can be used in. Thus it becomes imperative to know the usage from an expert who uses the word frequently...

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    I absolutely agree, a word or an idiom cannot be used in every context. The dictionaries do not state the contexts, they can be used in. Thus it becomes imperative to know the usage from an expert who uses the word frequently...
    OK.
    The old man abhors cabbages. He looks at these vegetables with repugnance.
    Now Bust3rboi has his sentences.

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    Re: Proper Usage

    Quote Originally Posted by Bust3rboi View Post
    Was that suppose to be a small-time joke there?There are times when you read definitions from dictionaries and think , how do i use this ? Knowing the definition of a word is one thing but properly using it is another.
    No, it's not any sort of joke.
    What good is it to you to be given sentences with words in them if you don't understand the words?
    Perhaps you don't just want what you asked for. Maybe you want someone to give you a meaning for these words. But this has been done by experts - they make dictionaries. Most dictionaries give examples. If yours don't, find some that do.


    abhor : to regard with extreme repugnance : loathe. synonyms see hate
    abhor - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary

    abhor verb [T not continuous] -rr- FORMAL
    to hate a way of behaving or thinking, often because you think it is immoral: I abhor all forms of racism.
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

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    Re: Proper Usage

    I understant why M.Raymott has answered like this.

    Sometimes people don't take the dictionnary and post to rapidily the question on the site.
    I am sure he did not want to be hard in this answer.

    I think nobody it's upset now.

    Thank Raymott and the other too.

    Bye.

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