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Thread: mnemonic device

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    #1

    mnemonic device

    Hallo,
    I am looking for mnemonic devices devised to help students remember how to spell certain words in the English language.
    For example: I before E except after C, or following to Q is U ...

    Could you please give me more?
    Thank you very much.
    H

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: mnemonic device

    Quote Originally Posted by hanky View Post
    Hallo,
    I am looking for mnemonic devices devised to help students remember how to spell certain words in the English language.
    For example: I before E except after C ...
    It's 'rules' like this that cause misspellings like the one in the subject to this thread: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...tml#post507194

    When I was taught this at school, my teacher insisted on the qualification '... when the I and the E make an /i:/ sound'. This avoids problems like 'thier', but there are still exceptions like 'weir' and 'protein'.

    A couple of weeks ago there was a directive sent by the Office for Standards in Education that advised teachers not to use this rule, as there were so many exceptions (at least I think it was from OfStED...).

    b

    • Member Info
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    #3

    Re: mnemonic device

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    It's 'rules' like this that cause misspellings like the one in the subject to this thread: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...tml#post507194

    When I was taught this at school, my teacher insisted on the qualification '... when the I and the E make an /i:/ sound'. This avoids problems like 'thier', but there are still exceptions like 'weir' and 'protein'.

    A couple of weeks ago there was a directive sent by the Office for Standards in Education that advised teachers not to use this rule, as there were so many exceptions (at least I think it was from OfStED...).

    b
    When I was at school my English teachers hadn't taught me any "rules" like that in my life. To be honest I do think that this kind of "rules" is still useful for learner because of the small number of exception. That is why I post here for some of "rules".
    Please let me know if you know any "rules" like that.
    Thanks a lot.
    H

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