Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    peppy_man is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default drop someone's jaw

    Hello.
    I saw 'drop someone's jaw' used on the Internet or something and
    went to my dictionary to check the exact meaning of the idiom.
    The example given in the dictionary was 'her jaw dropped in surprise'.
    The dictionary says that 'someone's jaw dropped' is used to in order to say that someone is very surprised'.
    It says nothing about the transitive form of this idiom.
    Is 'drop someone's jaw' acceptable?
    Also, is it correct that the meaning of 'drop someone's jaw' is 'to surprise someone very much?
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Quote Originally Posted by peppy_man
    Hello.
    I saw 'drop someone's jaw' used on the Internet or something and
    went to my dictionary to check the exact meaning of the idiom.
    The example given in the dictionary was 'her jaw dropped in surprise'.
    The dictionary says that 'someone's jaw dropped' is used to in order to say that someone is very surprised'.
    It says nothing about the transitive form of this idiom.
    Is 'drop someone's jaw' acceptable?
    Also, is it correct that the meaning of 'drop someone's jaw' is 'to surprise someone very much?
    Thank you.
    Someone's jaw drops but you can't drop someone's jaw. It's a phrase used when you are really suprised, shocked or in awe.

    ex.

    My jaw dropped when I saw my phone bill.

    I told him he can have my car. His eyes filled up with tears, his jaw dropped and then he gave me a big hug.

    He told me not to buy the house because it's haunted. Honestly I could see his jaw drop and his eyes bulged right out.

  3. #3
    peppy_man is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Marylin, thank you for you reply and giving me very informative examples.

    >Someone's jaw drops but you can't drop someone's jaw.

    You cleared up my question.
    Actually, there is another question.

    >My jaw dropped when I saw my phone bill.

    As I mentioned in my last post, I often see 'something dropped someone's jaw'
    on the Internet.
    According to your answer, this would be a mistake or an error, but
    could 'something dropped someone's jaw' have other meanings than 'surprising someone'?

    The example I saw on the Internet is as follows.

    The film dropped my jaw.

    Thanks in advance.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Quote Originally Posted by peppy_man
    Marylin, thank you for you reply and giving me very informative examples.

    >Someone's jaw drops but you can't drop someone's jaw.

    You cleared up my question.
    Actually, there is another question.

    >My jaw dropped when I saw my phone bill.

    As I mentioned in my last post, I often see 'something dropped someone's jaw'
    on the Internet.
    According to your answer, this would be a mistake or an error, but
    could 'something dropped someone's jaw' have other meanings than 'surprising someone'?

    The example I saw on the Internet is as follows.

    The film dropped my jaw.

    Thanks in advance.


    Again, nobody can drop your or anybody else's jaw. You can certainly break someone's jaw and hope they have a dental coverage...
    Now, I would never say "The film dropped my jaw", neither have I heard anyone else put it that way. It sounds strange but I wouldn't be suprised if it's used somewhere else maybe...

  5. #5
    peppy_man is offline Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    296
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Marylin, thank you for your quick reply.
    Now everything is clear.
    Thanks a million!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Quote Originally Posted by peppy_man
    Marylin, thank you for your quick reply.
    Now everything is clear.
    Thanks a million!
    You are very welcome, Peppy-man!

  7. #7
    henz988 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    105
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    My jaw dropped when I saw the motor-player’s thrilling performance, which means I was astonished or shocked then.

    But how can I describe such a situation?
    I had thought his performance would be thrilling, but it turned out to be just so-so. He was badly out of his game. Is there any saying that fits this occasion?

    Many thanks in advance.

  8. #8
    stuartnz's Avatar
    stuartnz is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • New Zealand
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    1,370
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: drop someone's jaw

    Quote Originally Posted by henz988 View Post
    My jaw dropped when I saw the motor-player’s thrilling performance, which means I was astonished or shocked then.

    But how can I describe such a situation?
    I had thought his performance would be thrilling, but it turned out to be just so-so. He was badly out of his game. Is there any saying that fits this occasion?

    Many thanks in advance.
    (not a professional teacher) "jaw-droppingly" is in use for "extremely", "surprisingly" or even "extremely surprisingly". "His performance was jaw-droppingly bad." I don't know whether it would normally be used of something that was "just so-so", though.

Similar Threads

  1. at the drop of a hat
    By blacknomi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2005, 22:34
  2. buy in a hike, not in a drop
    By NewHope in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-Oct-2004, 04:31

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •