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    #1

    nine-men or nine-man crew

    Nine-men or nine-man crew
    I'm with the second one.


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    #2

    Re: nine-men or nine-man crew

    Quote Originally Posted by fuadha View Post
    Nine-men or nine-man crew
    I'm with the second one.
    You're right - an English attributive noun doesn't generally inflect for the plural, even when modified by a nuimber great than one :
    A plan covering five years is a five-year plan, not a five-years plan (but check with a Brit on this)
    A brush for the teeth is a toothbrush, not a teethbrush.
    A tree bearing apples is an apple tree, not an apples tree
    And a noun that is only part of a modifying phrase behaves the same way: a girl who's three years old is a three-year-old girl, not a three-years-old girl. (BTW, the grammatical head of this modifying phrase is "old," not "year.")

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: nine-men or nine-man crew

    I agree completely, though I think we stick more closely to this Teutonic tradition than the Brits. I've seen them pluralize some of these things where we would leave them singular for sure.

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    #4

    Re: nine-men or nine-man crew

    These are sometimes called noun + noun or nouns as adjectives. Basically,
    it is always singular (no -s). There is an exception with fractions though:

    He received a three-fourths share of the votes.

    Also, it seems the hyphen (-) is used mostly in British English?

    I just wrote an article about this and some other uses of nouns as adjectives for measurements. It can give you a good idea of the differences.

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