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  1. #1
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
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    Default Salt Water or Salty Water

    Hi,

    You gargle with salt water or salty water?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    You gargle with salt water or salty water?

    Thanks
    Both are widely used.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Both are widely used.
    I have been told that Native Speakers do not use Salty Water, but prefer using Salt Water in this context...

  4. #4
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    I have been told that Native Speakers do not use Salty Water, but prefer using Salt Water in this context...
    I think you're correct. "Salt water" is a single concept, not really exactly like the adjective-noun as it would normally appear. In this sense, it is more like "high school" or "salad dressing" than it is like "wooden school" or "Italian dressing."

    It is hard to think of a way that "salty water" would be used. I believe it would mostly be used to describe water whose saltiness was unexpected or unusual.

    "He sipped from the canteen and was surprised to find that the water was salty. He quickly spit out the salty water and rinsed his mouth with fresh water."

    "Have two pots boiling on the stove. Add 2 Tbs salt to one pot and 2 Tbs sugar to the other. Drop the lemon rind into the salty water and let boil for 3 minutes. Drain and drop the rind into the sugar water."

  5. #5
    anupumh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Thanks a bundle for your elaborate replies and explaining the concept to its details. I also appreciate the fact that you ve been pointing out my mistakes, it helps and makes me more concious and aware while posting a thread.

    A quick one from this reply..

    What is a lemon rind?

  6. #6
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post

    A quick one from this reply..

    What is a lemon rind?
    LOL!

    "Lemon rind" is the peel of lemons. Sometimes lemon rind ( not "a lemon rind") is cut into shreds and boiled in many changes of water, then finally boiled in sugar syrup to glaze it. The shreds are then eaten (one by one, with the fingers) as a confection. This is almost more a pastime to entertain children when a blizzard is keeping them indoors than it is a significant food item.

    Lemon and orange rind is also made into a jelly-like spread (for toast, crackers, or bread) called "marmalade."

    That's what the chick said when he spied a citrus fruit in his nest:
    "Oh! Look at the orange Mama laid (orange marmalade)."
    This pun was considered a knee-slapper amongst my third-grade acquaintance.

  7. #7
    anupumh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    Well I am gonna keep you busy now and I cannot be blammed.. LOL

    I have heard of orange marmalade, though never tasted it, we have our own Indian name for it.

    Now..

    What is glaze (boiled in sugar syrup to glaze it)?
    What is a confection (as a confection)? Has it to do with confectionary?
    What is blizzard (entertain children when a blizzard is keeping them)?
    What is spied (spied a citrus fruit in his nest)? Is it the act of spying?
    What is a knee-slapper?
    What do you mean by third-grade acquaintance?

    Thanks a ton

  8. #8
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Salt Water or Salty Water

    [QUOTE=anupumh;513534]Well I am gonna keep you busy now and I cannot be blammed.. LOL

    I have heard of orange marmalade, though never tasted it, we have our own Indian name for it.

    What is the Indian name for it?

    Now..

    What is glaze (boiled in sugar syrup to glaze it)?
    In this context, "to glaze" means "to coat thickly with sugar."
    (It also has a meaning connected to the installation of window glass.)


    What is a confection (as a confection)? Has it to do with confectionary?
    Yes. In this context, the word "confection" refers to any sweetmeat that does not really have its own name. This little treat is not a pastry, for example. It is more like home-made "candy," which in British English would be called a "sweet," I understand.


    What is blizzard (entertain children when a blizzard is keeping them)?
    A blizzard is a severe winter snowstorm. School is canceled because the roads are dangerous and slow, so children find themselves with time on their hands. At first they rejoice and go out to play winter games (sledding, building snowmen, and so on.) But soon they become too cold, and their mittens get soaked from melted snow, so they come right back home again. Then there is a crisis, because they are idle. But cooking is always fun on a cold day.

    Here is an American child in snow gear outdoors after a blizzard
    http://elainereese.files.wordpress.c...amsnow78-1.jpg


    What is spied (spied a citrus fruit in his nest)? Is it the act of spying?
    No, not in this context. Here it means "to espy" -- to spot, to see, to catch sight of.


    What is a knee-slapper?
    This is a colloquialism for "such a grand and funny joke that you slap your own knee because you're laughing so hard." The expression "a real knee-slapper" means "a really funny joke." But nowadays this expression is so old-fashioned that it is not ever used without ironic or comic intent -- as I meant it to be understood. To call that silly pun a "knee-slapper" is to make fun of it as a joke, to say it was highly funny only in a sarcastic sense.


    What do you mean by third-grade acquaintance?
    This also is meant in a comical sense. It literally means all the other kids I knew when we were in the third grade (the third year of school, around age 8.) It is a stuffy way to refer to a bunch of silly little kids, so the intent was to be funny by ironic contrast.

    On the other hand, my "UsingEnglish acquaintance" actually is enjoyable -- no irony involved.
    Last edited by Ann1977; 10-Sep-2009 at 03:15.

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