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Thread: Pronunciation

  1. Ikramullah's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Pronunciation

    /'ba:t.l/
    What is dot used for in the phonetic symbols of bottle?
    Why do we use dots in phonetic symbols?

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Pronunciation

    When there are two : it means we make the preceding vowel longer.

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    #3

    Question Re: Pronunciation

    I do not mean the colon. I mean the period (full stop).
    Why is full stop used in the phonetics of a word as in my thread above?

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    #4

    Re: Pronunciation

    The dot refers to the so-called 'glottal stop': a speech sound made by completely closing and then opening your glottis (with a small puff of air which produces a flap T as in little).

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by wace View Post
    The dot refers to the so-called 'glottal stop': a speech sound made by completely closing and then opening your glottis (with a small puff of air which produces a flap T as in little).
    Are you sure? In IPA, a glottal stop is / ʔ/ a flapped t is a fishhook / ɾ/
    A flap t is alveolar, and sounds somewhat like a /d/.
    In what system is a glottal stop or a flapped t written as /t./?
    I'm pretty sure that a period doesn't appear in IPA like this.

    Americans might say /ba:ɾəl/
    Cockneys would say /bɒʔəl/
    Iím not sure who would say /ba:ʔəl/ It doesnít sound natural.

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    #6

    Re: Pronunciation

    Well, yes I'm pretty sure it's a sort of glottal stop as a variant of medial t (as in bottle or water), though I wouldn't have used quite the same phonemic transcription.

    By the way, Raymott, you must think we're all a bit shortsighted....
    Just kidding....

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Pronunciation

    Quote Originally Posted by wace View Post
    Well, yes I'm pretty sure it's a sort of glottal stop as a variant of medial t (as in bottle or water), though I wouldn't have used quite the same phonemic transcription.

    By the way, Raymott, you must think we're all a bit shortsighted....
    Just kidding....
    No, the reason for the large letters is to make the phonetic descriptions readable. Sometimes when you copy material from Word, the software here just makes it whatever size it wants to. I couldn't be bothered getting it perfect.

    OK, so /t./ being a glottal stop is a guess.
    My guess is that . is an abbreviation of schwa here. But who knows?

  6. anupumh's Avatar
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    #8

    Angry Re: Pronunciation

    Well my guess would be that its has something to do with syllabic consonants or it could be a symbol which demarkates 2 syllables in bottle..

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    #9

    Re: Pronunciation

    I'd say this: a glottal stop it isn't, as we never use the glottis for that word, unless we are Cockneys from London.

    Therefore the . probably signifies that the t-l junction is lengthened to that of a vowel, although the mouth does not produce a vowel per se. Thus the brief /t/ is followed by an /l/ which takes the time of a full syllable to form and utter.

    By the way, I disagree that the /a/ sound (though this is the correct vowel quality in AmE) should be long in this word. It's rather a short vowel around here.

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    #10

    Re: Pronunciation

    [ Therefore the . probably signifies that the t-l junction is lengthened to that of a vowel, although the mouth does not produce a vowel per se. Thus the brief /t/ is followed by an /l/ which takes the time of a full syllable to form and utter.
    .[/QUOTE]

    Check out this site:

    www.teachingenglish.org.uk/think/.../glottal-stop

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