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  1. #1
    GUEST2008 is offline Key Member
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    Default stand for/fill in for

    Hi

    Mark's not at work today, who will stand in for him.
    Mark's not at work today, who will fill in for him.

    --- Do they mean the same thing?

  2. #2
    albeit is offline Banned
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    Default Re: stand for/fill in for

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Mark's not at work today, who will stand in for him.
    Mark's not at work today, who will fill in for him.

    --- Do they mean the same thing?
    'fill in for sb' is, to my mind, the normal neutral while 'stand in for him', which seems to carry connotations of greater responsibility than simply doing Mark's job for the day, isn't what would be used for this situation.

  3. #3
    GUEST2008 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: stand for/fill in for

    So it's better to say "fill in for" in this case?

    So when would you use "stand in for"?

    cheers

  4. #4
    albeit is offline Banned
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    Default Re: stand for/fill in for

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    So it's better to say "fill in for" in this case?

    So when would you use "stand in for"?

    cheers
    As I mentioned, Guest, it holds a feeling of greater responsibility. This might help.

    [man who is to give a big presentation to a group of investors phones in sick]

    Man: Hello, Boss. I'm in the hospital with a case of appendicitis. I'll be going into surgery after lunch.

    Boss: What?! I guess we'll have to cancel the big meeting.

    Man: No, don't do that. Brian has agreed to stand in for me. He knows this subject as well as I do. He's been working on this thing with me for a month and I know that he's a better speaker so things should go perfectly.

    Boss: Well, if you say so, I'll have to trust you.


    ===============

    And this,

    stand in for - idiom
    Substitute for, as in He's kindly agreed to stand in for me at the reception. [Early 1900s]
    The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


    stand in for - meaning

  5. #5
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: stand for/fill in for

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Mark's not at work today, who will stand in for him.
    Mark's not at work today, who will fill in for him.

    --- Do they mean the same thing?
    Aside from your vocabulary question, note that this is a comma slice. You cannot join to independent clauses with a comma.

    Mark's not at work today. Who will fill in for him?

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