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Thread: Which is Which

  1. #1
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
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    Question Which is Which

    Hi,

    Please check the sentence typed below.

    If you taste Gin and Vodka, can you identify which is which?

    Is this sentence appropriate? How will a native speaker express the same thought?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Which is Which

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Please check the sentence typed below.

    If you taste Gin and Vodka, can you identify which is which?

    Is this sentence appropriate? How will a native speaker express the same thought?

    Thanks

    That is how I would express this thought. I am quite sure that no one would ever notice any oddity about this sentence in real life, no matter how many variations are at least conceivable.

    Possibly a more informal expression would be "can you tell" rather than "can you taste" or "can you identify."

    -- "Can you tell which is which by tasting gin and vodka?"

    An alternate way of asking the same question could be:
    "Can you taste the difference between gin and vodka?" or
    "Can you tell the difference between gin and vodka?"

    The words "gin" and "vodka" should not begin with upper-case letters.

  3. #3
    anupumh's Avatar
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    Default Re: Which is Which

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    That is how I would express this thought. I am quite sure that no one would ever notice any oddity about this sentence in real life, no matter how many variations are at least conceivable.

    Possibly a more informal expression would be "can you tell" rather than "can you taste" or "can you identify."

    -- "Can you tell which is which by tasting gin and vodka?"

    An alternate way of asking the same question could be:
    "Can you taste the difference between gin and vodka?" or
    "Can you tell the difference between gin and vodka?"

    The words "gin" and "vodka" should not begin with upper-case letters.
    Thus the usage of "which is which" is accepted in native speakers construction, am i correct?

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Which is Which

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Thus the usage of "which is which" is accepted in native speakers construction, am i correct?
    Yes, quite correct.

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