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  1. #1
    yellowribbon is offline Newbie
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    Default when come the windy days

    Is the following sentence correct please?
    I am worry that however secure the fixing, flopping noise my be generated when come the windy days.
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: when come the windy days

    Quote Originally Posted by yellowribbon View Post
    Is the following sentence correct please?
    I am worryied that however secure the fixing, a flopping noise may be generated when come the windy days.
    Thank you.
    Nearly... This use of 'come' with no adverb of time is a trace of the subjunctive. (Some analysts would say it just is one, but they know what I think! * It means 'when that time comes'.

    'The windy days' could be a mistake. The more common possibilities are:

    come windy days - on days like that
    on a windy day - on a day like that

    But I didn't change it in your example because it might mean 'on the days like that, which always happen at a certain time of year in this part of the world'.

    b
    *PS In brief, my view is that there are only a handful of verbs that can denote modality by using a verbal inflexion; examples are 'come', 'do', 'be', 'have', and inflected forms of those verbs - 'Come tomorrow, things will be different', 'Did they but have eyes to see, they would know that...', 'Were he the son of a King, I would still call him a fool', 'Had I but the time, I would ...'.

    But with most verbs this doesn't work: Read I it in The Times, I would believe it.'

    Note: Am English is much more protective of the subjunctive than Br English. For more of this discussion, there are many threads where it's been flogged to death; this search will be a start: UsingEnglish.com ESL Forum - Search Results

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