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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Help needed to understand these expressions!!!

    Hi, teachers. First of all, thanks for your helps. I got tons of questions about some expressions.


    1. Com on, mijo.
    What is "mijo"? The lady who said this is from South America, therefore I think this is kind of Spanish or something like that.

    2. I'm sick of feeling like the third wheel.
    What is "the third wheel"? I think this means he feels like a stranger to others.

    3. But I think I should go with the Bass Weejuns. You know, preppy's back.
    What is "preppy's back"? "preppy" is some kind of rich parents' children, isn't it?

    4. It's making you look a little "hepi b."
    What is "hepi b"? I have absolutely no idea.

    5. It's fine, Mrs. Fleischman, if you're gonna continue that affair with the superintendent of the school district.
    Who is "Mrs. Fleischman"? Is this lady famous for her affairs?

    6. I'll try to get her back to you in time for "Where in the World is Matt Lauer."
    Is this some expressions? "Matt Lauer" is an anchor, right? Does this sentence have any special meanings?

  2. #2
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Default Re: Help needed to understand these expressions!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    Hi, teachers. First of all, thanks for your helps. I got tons of questions about some expressions.
    First of all, may I offer a correction? The expression is: "Thanks for your help." Help is not a noun that is pluralized in English. (The same goes for assistance.)

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    1. Com on, mijo.
    What is "mijo"? The lady who said this is from South America, therefore I think this is kind of Spanish or something like that.
    Unless the lady was from Brazil, I think it is a good guess that mijo is indeed Spanish. It is a possibility that mijo is somebody's name. That would, of course, depend on the context in which it was said. Example: "Come on, Ron! Let's get going!" :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    2. I'm sick of feeling like the third wheel.
    What is "the third wheel"? I think this means he feels like a stranger to others.
    He would not be a stranger, but he might be feeling like one. That is an expression that is used when somebody is a member of a group of three and the other two are a couple. That is, the other two have what we old fogies used to call a romantic relationship. The other person would understandably feel excluded at times. In other words, he would be like a third wheel on a bicycle.


    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    ]3. But I think I should go with the Bass Weejuns. You know, preppy's back.
    What is "preppy's back"? "preppy" is some kind of rich parents' children, isn't it?
    Yes, a "preppy" is somebody who went to "prep" school, a private preparatory, or high school. Some people might consider him a rich kid. Preppies are supposed to be stuck up. :wink:

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    4. It's making you look a little "hepi b."
    What is "hepi b"? I have absolutely no idea.
    Me neither. :wink: It looks to me like youth slang, and I am not in the loop. (Not that I ever was.) Maybe one of our younger members can be helpful with that one.

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    5. It's fine, Mrs. Fleischman, if you're gonna continue that affair with the superintendent of the school district.
    Who is "Mrs. Fleischman"? Is this lady famous for her affairs?
    It would seem the Mrs. Fleischman was the person being addressed. I don't know if she is famous for her affairs, but she seems to be having one with the superintendent of the school district.

    Quote Originally Posted by WhoNeedHelp
    6. I'll try to get her back to you in time for "Where in the World is Matt Lauer."
    Is this some expressions? "Matt Lauer" is an anchor, right? Does this sentence have any special meanings?
    Matt Lauer is a host of a morning show on one of the broadcast networks. That expression might have special meaning only to the people involved in the conversation.

    :)

  3. #3
    Will Guest

    Default

    4. It's making you look a little "hepi b."
    What is "hepi b"? I have absolutely no idea.

    Me neither. It looks to me like youth slang, and I am not in the loop. (Not that I ever was.) Maybe one of our younger members can be helpful with that one.
    I have no idea. The first thing I thought of when I saw "hepi b" was hepititus(sp?) B, but I don't know what that would have to do with it.

  4. #4
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will
    I have no idea. The first thing I thought of when I saw "hepi b" was hepititus(sp?) B, but I don't know what that would have to do with it.
    That is an interesting idea. The only problem I see with that is that I don't think hepatitis B has become so common that the term would evolve into a slang expression. (I certainly hope that is the case.)

    (hepato = liver; itis = inflammation; hepatitis = liver disease)

    :wink:

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    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Will, I think you're right. I've heard 'Hep B' used in the UK as a slang version, so it sounds logical. As it is a disease transmitted sexually, it is little surprise that there is a slang term for it, like 'syph', or more general terms like the 'clap' for any STD. A few years ago, AIDS was known here as 'slim', but I haven't heard it used for a few years, probably because the pattern of death has changed.

  6. #6
    RonBee's Avatar
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    I didn't know hepatitis B was so common, nor did I know about it being an STD. That is sad news.

    :(

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    It was talked about a lot a few years ago, but you don't hear much about it now. That doesn't necessarily mean it's gone away, though.

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