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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default the fat is in the fire/in the long run/in high spirits/to talk shop/lose my temper

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “Yes,” murmured Sir Lawrence, watching her, “the fat is in the fire”, as old Forsyte would have said.
    the fat is in the fire = a step has been taken, something done,which commits to further action, or will produce excitements, indignation, etc.

    Hospital meant charring as far as work went but in its social atmosphere it meant something more interesting, more romantic, and, in the long run, more respectable.

    In the long run we are all dead.

    It would be cheaper in the long run.
    in the long run = eventually, in the end

    I let oneself in for several hours’ boredom every day, Dixon. A couple more won’t break my back.
    to let oneself in for = to be persuaded to do something

    The young women wore a bunch of violets and seemed in high spirits.

    Carrie reached home in high spirits, which she could scarcely conceal.
    in high spirits = cheerful

    So you can image how embarrassing it all is. I’m simply beside myself.
    to be beside oneself = to be wildly excited, out of one’s senses

    As they walked up the street together they began to talk shop.
    to talk shop = to speak of business matters; to talk about one’s everyday work with someone who also does the same job

    She frowned. “I shall lose my temper. You’ll make me lose my temper. Why do you hide so much from me?”
    to lose one’s temper = to lose control of oneself in a moment of anger; to get angry or impatient

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V.

  2. #2
    Searching for language is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: the fat is in the fire/in the long run/in high spirits/to talk shop/lose my tempe

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    “Yes,” murmured Sir Lawrence, watching her, “the fat is in the fire”, as old Forsyte would have said.
    the fat is in the fire = a step has been taken, something done,which commits to further action, or will produce excitements, indignation, etc. I think this is a little stronger than just being committed to further action. Once the fat is in the fire, there is no stopping it, no way to turn something around anymore.

    Hospital meant charring as far as work went but in its social atmosphere it meant something more interesting, more romantic, and, in the long run, more respectable.

    In the long run we are all dead.

    It would be cheaper in the long run.
    in the long run = eventually, in the end But I don't understand what is meant by "Hospital meant charring"?????

    I let oneself in for several hours’ boredom every day, Dixon. A couple more won’t break my back.
    to let oneself in for = to be persuaded to do something You have the correct meaning, but the sentence should be "I let myself in for.............."
    Or, "If one lets oneself in for several hours of boredome every day, Dixon, a couple more won't break one's back"


    The young women wore a bunch of violets and seemed in high spirits.

    Carrie reached home in high spirits, which she could scarcely conceal.
    in high spirits = cheerful Again, the meaning is correct, but the sentence is lacking. It should be Carrie reached her home in high spirits, or Carrie arrived home in high spirits.

    So you can image how embarrassing it all is. I’m simply beside myself.
    to be beside oneself = to be wildly excited, out of one’s senses

    As they walked up the street together they began to talk shop.
    to talk shop = to speak of business matters; to talk about one’s everyday work with someone who also does the same job

    She frowned. “I shall lose my temper. You’ll make me lose my temper. Why do you hide so much from me?”
    to lose one’s temper = to lose control of oneself in a moment of anger; to get angry or impatient

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V.
    I am not a teacher.

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