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    #1

    give an inkling/have an inkling/to be tickled to death/frame of mind

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Whatever it was, it baffled me. I can’t give an inkling of what I saw in the brute eyes; it wasn’t light, it wasn’t color. It was something that moved.
    He stood before me, motionless, with a mocking smile in his eyes; but for all that, for a moment I had an inkling of a fiery, tortured spirit.
    to have an inkling (of) = to have a vague idea of

    He had developed the habit pf dropping in on her something during the week to discuss the latest news about Jan.
    Only two days and I’ll be back. Then I can see every day. Ypu’ll probably get sick of me popping in.
    to drop in (pop in) = to make a casual visit

    He’ll be tickled to death to see you.
    to be tickled to death = very much pleased

    I had never seen Spence in this morbid frame of mind.
    frame of mind = particular state or disposition of the mind, mood

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regard,

    V.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: give an inkling/have an inkling/to be tickled to death/frame of mind

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Whatever it was, it baffled me. I canít give an inkling of what I saw in the brute eyes; it wasnít light, it wasnít color. It was something that moved.
    I don't think we "give an inkling," although we GET an inkling maybe.

    Maybe you could say, "I can't give you even an inkling of what I saw.'


    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    He stood before me, motionless, with a mocking smile in his eyes; but for all that, for a moment I had an inkling of a fiery, tortured spirit.
    to have an inkling (of) = to have a vague idea of
    Yes, this is how I would use the expression.

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    He had developed the habit pf dropping in on her something during the week to discuss the latest news about Jan.
    Only two days and Iíll be back. Then I can see every day. Ypuíll probably get sick of me popping in.
    to drop in (pop in) = to make a casual visit
    I think "popping in on someone" is a Britishism, but this is how it's used, I believe.

    "He had developed the habit pf dropping in on her something during the week . . ."
    "something" is the wrong word.
    "some TIME during the week" is the phrase here, but since it was an ongoing habit, I think "every now and then during the week" would be better.
    > "He said he would drop in some time during the week"
    This means to make one visit some time in the week to come.

    > "He took to dropping in on her during the week."
    This implies that he made numerous, randomly-scheduled visits.

    > "He he used to drop in on her now and then during the week."
    This means that in those days, he visited her frequently and randomly.

    In the last two sentences, I'm not so sure about the function of "during the week." To specify that an habitual act took place "during the week" seems wrong. I think many readers would interpret it as "during the work week but not on weekends."
    -------
    Youíll probably get sick of me popping in.
    This should be MY popping in, since "popping " is a gerund.
    -------------------------------------------

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Heíll be tickled to death to see you.
    to be tickled to death = very much pleased

    I had never seen Spence in this morbid frame of mind.
    frame of mind = particular state or disposition of the mind, mood
    This is how I'd use these phrases.

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