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    vil is offline VIP Member
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    Default interpretation of a few connotations of "anticipate"

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    Don’t anticipate your income!
    Don’t order goods, before you receive your income.
    He had to anticipate and prevent the duke's purpose.
    He would probably have died by the hand of the executioner, if indeed the executioner had not been anticipated by the populace.
    anticipate = to be before in doing; to do or take before another; to preclude or prevent by prior action

    I would not anticipate the relish of any happiness, nor feel the weight of any misery, before it actually arrives.
    Timid men were anticipating another civil war.
    anticipate = to look forward to, especially with pleasure; expect;
    She anticipated by half an hour the usual time of her arrival.
    It was said that Columbus discovered America, but he was probably anticipated by sailors from Norway who reached Labrador 500 years earlier.
    anticipate = to deal with beforehand

    She have anticipated my wishes.
    A good general tries to anticipate the enemy’s movements.
    He anticipated the every enemy’s move.
    We don’t anticipate much trouble.
    The director anticipated that demand would fall.
    The director anticipated a fall in demand.
    anticipate = foresee

    We anticipate spending two weeks here.
    anticipate = have a foretaste for

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

  2. #2
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    RonBee is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: interpretation of a few connotations of "anticipate"

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Donít anticipate your income! OK (But I want to say, "Why not?")
    Donít order goods, before you receive your income. OK (But delete the comma.)
    He had to anticipate and prevent the duke's purpose. The word "purpose" doesn't work there. Try something else.
    He would probably have died by the hand of the executioner, if indeed the executioner had not been anticipated by the populace. I am not sure what that is supposed to mean.
    anticipate = to be before in doing; to do or take before another; to preclude or prevent by prior action

    I would not anticipate the relish of any happiness, nor feel the weight of any misery, before it actually arrives. Possibly.
    Timid men were anticipating another civil war. OK
    anticipate = to look forward to, especially with pleasure; expect;
    She anticipated by half an hour the usual time of her arrival. She arrived before usual?
    It was said that Columbus discovered America, but he was probably anticipated by sailors from Norway who reached Labrador 500 years earlier. OK
    anticipate = to deal with beforehand

    She has anticipated my wishes. OK
    A good general tries to anticipate the enemyís movements. OK
    He anticipated the every enemyís move. OK
    We donít anticipate much trouble. OK
    The director anticipated that demand would fall. OK
    The director anticipated a fall in demand. OK
    anticipate = foresee

    We anticipate spending two weeks here. OK
    anticipate = have a foretaste for

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.

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