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  1. #1
    Yulissa Guest

    Default Differences between Informal and Colloquial English

    Hello. I would like to know if spelling such as "gonna", "happenin", "an'", "ye" (=you) is acceptable in Colloquial English (or would it be Slang already?)

    And another question is about the use of words. In one of my assignments I have to transform the scientific text about the Sun into Informal and Colloquial styles. So, in the original text they use the name of organization "National Science Foundation's National Solar Observatory (NSO)". Do I have to keep it as it is even in Colloquial style? Or can I just say "NSF" instead?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Differences between Informal and Colloquial English

    Simply leaving off the G on words like happening, or writing "an" for "and" is not informal or colloquial - in my opinion, it's suitable ONLY if you are writing dialogue and want to show how the person sounds.

    As for "ye" I have never come across that in any sort of modern writing or speech.

    "Gonna" is the only only I would find acceptable as colloquial, and NOT as informal. When English learners write things like "im gonna have a test in E next wk n i need ur help" it makes me want to scream. In a text message, I don't object to "gonna" and I can live with it in an e-mail between friends. Not in a post here, where people are supposed to be learning proper English.

    So in short, No, No, No.

    As for the abbreviation, it's common to spell it out the first time with the abbreviation in parentheses after it. The National Solar Observatory (NSO). The National Science Foundation (NSF). All future references to either one can be simply NSO or NSF, as applicable.

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