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  1. Anonymous
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    #1

    beyond reasonable doubt

    Are these sentences correct:
    1-I know beyond reasonable doubt that he is guilty.
    2-Can you affirm beyond reasonable doubt that he is guilty?

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    #2
    Yes.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3
    One minor correction. It should be beyond a reasonable doubt. I don't think the phrase is ever used without the article.

    :)

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    #4
    It can be countable or uncountable in BE:
    beyong reasonable doubt
    beyond any reasonable doubt
    beyond a reasonable doubt

    They all sound fine to me.

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #5
    Hm. I have always heard beyond a reasonable doubt. Perhaps it is a BE/AE difference. Maybe I'll do a Google check and see what I come up with.

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    #6
    It's three times more common with the article, but without gets 30,000 hits.

  4. RonBee's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    It's three times more common with the article, but without gets 30,000 hits.
    Interesting. I had always heard that in instructions to a jury in a criminal case that they must find the defendant guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. It is reasonable to expect tho that there are other circumstance in which that phrase is used. I wonder if the one without the article is used in a different context. I expect that that might be the case.

    :)

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    #8
    It could be- I've never sat on a jury.

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