Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,159
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Hello.



    1. I saw a visually impaired woman with a guide dog on the street.
    2. I saw a visually impaired woman with a Seeing Eye dog on the street.

    Is "guide dog" BE, and is "Seeing Eye dog" AE?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,672
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.



    1. I saw a visually impaired woman with a guide dog on the street.
    2. I saw a visually impaired woman with a Seeing Eye dog on the street.

    Is "guide dog" BE, and is "Seeing Eye dog" AE?

    Thank you.
    It's "guide dog" in BrE.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.



    1. I saw a visually impaired woman with a guide dog on the street.
    2. I saw a visually impaired woman with a Seeing Eye dog on the street.

    Is "guide dog" BE, and is "Seeing Eye dog" AE?

    Thank you.
    I've heard both. Both sound familiar. However, I would not capitalize "seeing eye dog". Also, be careful because "guide dog" can sound like "guy dog".

  4. #4
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Dear Daruma:

    I also have heard both terms used (in the US). There are several large organizations that provide these dogs. One is Guide Dogs for the Blind, another is Guide Dogs of America, and a third is The Seeing Eye. Apparently, The Seeing Eye was the first organization of this kind in the US.

    From a check of related websites it appears that 'guide dog' is becoming the preferred term, but either one is acceptable.

    There also exists the category of 'companion animal.' Canine Companions provides 'skilled service dogs' to people with disabilities other than blindness. Hearing dogs for deaf people, service dogs for para- and quadriplegics, and many others.

    I hope this was not more than you ever wanted to know on this topic!

    Petra

  5. #5
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,672
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I've heard both. Both sound familiar. However, I would not capitalize "seeing eye dog". Also, be careful because "guide dog" can sound like "guy dog".
    "Guy Dog"??? What planet are you on? "Ground control to Major Tom, take your protien pills and put your helmet on."

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Guy Dog"??? What planet are you on? "Ground control to Major Tom, take your protien pills and put your helmet on."
    Have you ever taught pronunciation? Have students ever asked you why combinations of words sound the same? Have they ever indicated to you that English can be confusing sometimes in this way? Maybe? If not, or if so, I would say that this is a way in which ESL contrasts with EFL. ESL students deal with English every day, and they hear a lot of things that are confusing. Have you ever given pronunciation and listening dictiation? For example, "I'd do that" sounds the same as "I do that". Context clears things up: I'd do that if I were you. I do that every day. However, in conversation, we don't always use both the "if" clause - adverb clause and the result clause, in this case the "would clause".

    Here's just one example that I happen to have stored away.

    Change the chain. Chain the chain.

    Roberto doesn't know what "chain the chain" means. Interesting. Roberto, he said "change the chain". It's just the "ge" sound is lost with all that noise in the background from the machine. He really said "change the chain" as in "get another chain for the machine".

    These two sentences can sound the same. Obviously, "change the chain" is what the speaker really said. But this might not be immediately apparent to the factory worker who needs to get another chain for the machine. That's a real-life example, by the way. Students will ask you many things if you have an open, welcome, and encouraging attitude towards questions. I don't think all ESL-EFL teachers openly show such attitudes because they might not know how to answer every and any question a student has. That's a risk we must take just the same. That's how it goes. I wanna hear those questions. Let me know if you have a question or if you don't understand something. Answering questions online is fun, interesting, and good practice. It's good practice for when someone says "But why?"

    To conclude, someone who hears "guide dog" might think they hear "guy dog" if they've never heard of a "guide dog". This is because of how we link our words together when we speak.

    guydog - guiddog - guidog

    That's how things go.

  7. #7
    Ouisch's Avatar
    Ouisch is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    4,142
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    PROESL, please dial it back a notch. And bhaisahab? There are more tactful ways to publicly disagree with a post.

    I can see PROESL's point that phrases can be mis-heard (that's why so many people thought Jimi Hendrix was singing "Excuse me while I kiss this guy" instead of "Excuse me while I kiss the sky"), but on the other hand, "Guide Dog" is a very common and legitimate term for those canines who assist the blind. As pyong explained, there are several different organizations (in the US, anyway) that train such dogs, and each has its own set of guidelines and terminology. For example, here in my home state of Michigan, Leader Dogs for the Blind is funded strictly by donations (mainly via the Lions Cub) and matches people with dogs completely free of charge. They have a "campus" where blind folks from all over North America come and live in a "dormitory" while getting to know their dog and learning how to work with him/her. Anyway, because this institution is located in Michigan, it is more common for residents in the Great Lakes area to refer to such dogs as "leader dogs." Nevertheless, we still understand what is meant by "guide dog" and "seeing eye dog."

    And, to be honest, when referring to animals, or canines in particular, it is more common to refer to them as either male and female, or even boy and girl. When encountering a stranger with a dog on a leash the usual colloquial English question would be "Is it a male or female?" or "Is this a boy or a girl?" versus "Is this a guy or a gal?"

    OK, you two, shake hands, punch each other in the shoulder and carry on.
    Last edited by Ouisch; 26-Sep-2009 at 20:17.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    2,036
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Guy Dog"??? What planet are you on? "Ground control to Major Tom, take your protien pills and put your helmet on."

    Here's a "guy dog", and here's a "guide dog". I would not like to see an unsuspecting ELL get the two confused when he or she walks into a pet store. If a blind ELL needed a guide dog, and went home with a "guy dog", it wouldn't be very convenient, would it?

  9. #9
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,159
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Everyone,

    Thank you very much for the comments, but could you please focus on what the dogs in the photo are called? Please start a new thread to talk about "guy dog."

  10. #10
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    1,159
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Seeing Eye dog [countable] trademark American English

    a dog trained to guide blind people [= guide dog British English]

    (from the Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Advanced Learner's Dictionary)

    Seeing Eye dog - Definition from Longman English Dictionary Online

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •