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  1. #11
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Petra's post answered your original question completely.

    Guide dog in the UK
    Seeing-eye dog or guide dog in the US, even though "Seeing Eye" is a proper name, because it has become a generic term.



    Ouisch added that in her region, they are also called "leader dogs."

  2. #12
    Daruma is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    USA TODAY

    seeing-eye dog
    MSNBC Quotes Page - USATODAY.com
    Just as with seeing-eye dogs for the blind, trained dogs are now being used to help autistic children deal with their disabilities.

    Seeing Eye dog
    USATODAY.com - The truth about Katz's 'Dogs': Humans are the stars
    The juxtaposition of the words "work" and "dog" brings to mind the concept of Seeing Eye dogs or canines that herd sheep.

    seeing eye dog
    USATODAY.com - US Airways will restrict flying minors, pets
    The policy change does not apply to the transportation of service animals such as seeing eye dogs.

  3. #13
    pyoung is offline Senior Member
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Everyone,

    Thank you very much for the comments, but could you please focus on what the dogs in the photo are called? Please start a new thread to talk about "guy dog."
    Dear Daruma:

    The dogs in the photo are called either 'guide dogs' or seeing eye dogs.' These terms are basically interchangeable, unless, as I mentioned, the dogs are used to help people with other types of disabilities, in which case they may be called 'hearing dogs,' 'companion dogs,' skilled companion dogs,' etc.

    Best wishes,

    Petra

  4. #14
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by Ouisch View Post


    And, to be honest, when referring to animals, or canines in particular, it is more common to refer to them as either male and female, or even boy and girl. When encountering a stranger with a dog on a leash the usual colloquial English question would be "Is it a male or female?" or "Is this a boy or a girl?" versus "Is this a guy or a gal?"
    Sorry if I was tactless. Being a dog owner, I was extremely surprised at the idea that someone could mistake "guide dog" for "guy dog". I have never in all my life heard of a male dog referred to as a "guy".

  5. #15
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Sorry if I was tactless. Being a dog owner, I was extremely surprised at the idea that someone could mistake "guide dog" for "guy dog". I have never in all my life heard of a male dog referred to as a "guy".

    Sorry to mention this. But, I might do so.

    It's the first time that I actually get to know how people call these doggies. And in my cunlture, there're several phrases with the word dog in it, that people use to insult. Had I not read this thread, I might think someone is saying 'Guy dog' to me, in certain circumstances.

  6. #16
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    Smile Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Sorry if I was tactless. Being a dog owner, I was extremely surprised at the idea that someone could mistake "guide dog" for "guy dog". I have never in all my life heard of a male dog referred to as a "guy".
    Neither have I ever heard anyone refer to a male dog as "guy".

    This has to do with how words sound when they are linked, or connected, by the same sound and the the first part of a word is the same for two words. Never had I thought that someone could think otherwise.

    I'll show the the example again, and refer back to the questions I asked earlier, to which I believe I now know the answers.

    guy - This sounds like the "gui" in "guide

    d - This is the last sound of the word "guide".

    d - This is the first sound of the word "dog".

    When we pronounce "guide" and follow it with "dog", it sounds like there is only one "d" sound. This can easily make it so that "guide_dog" sounds exactly like "guy_dog". When we speak English we don't stop after each word in order to be sure that each word is clearly heard as one word. We link sounds together. This is one aspect of teaching English pronunciation. And it is one example of how pronuniciation is related to listening skills. Furthermore, it's a genuine example of a difficulty one might have with comprehending what one hears. This really has to do with listening comprehension in the true sense of the word - one aspect of listening comprehension that is. It's not the academic notion of comprehension that requires one to go back to a text after reading it in order to answer multiple choice questions, gap-fill questions, and yes-no questions.
    Last edited by PROESL; 28-Sep-2009 at 03:05.

  7. #17
    Anglika is offline No Longer With Us
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    This seems to me a specious argument and depends on who you are hearing. I have never heard anyone say "guide dog" and lose the two "d"s. Not only that, but context ought to indicate what is intended.

    If this is the way you have heard it pronounced, it implies a characteristic modern sloppiness in pronouncing the consonants, which of course is one reason so many people do have problems understanding spoken English.

  8. #18
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    This seems to me a specious argument and depends on who you are hearing. I have never heard anyone say "guide dog" and lose the two "d"s. Not only that, but context ought to indicate what is intended.

    If this is the way you have heard it pronounced, it implies a characteristic modern sloppiness in pronouncing the consonants, which of course is one reason so many people do have problems understanding spoken English.
    I don't agree with your assessment. A student from China posted a reply affirming the confusion that is possible when one has not heard of a particular term. My argument is not specious. It's knowledge based on my professional experience, and I take that seriously.

    Yes, context ought to indicate what is intended. What if context fails and doesn't indicate what is intended?
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/105225-guide-dog-seeing-eye-dog-2.html#post519510


    I know that this is not a foreign idea in BrE because, as I've mentioned at this forum a number of times, I listen to the BBC World Report. I haven't noticed anything radically different in BrE pronunciation other than the obvious BrE accent. Linking, or connecting, words together occurs in BrE as well. It's not simply an AmE consideration, and it's not sloppiness.

    Linking, or connecting sounds, is not characteristic modern sloppiness. It's natural to connect and link words together without taking care to pronounce each and every sound perfectly clear. Linking is an aspect of teaching English pronunciation. It's part of the method of teaching English pronunciation, and I take it seriously, as do other ESL teachers. I'm a teacher and a consultant. I'm not an academic, nor am I a "language maven".

    I didn't say that two d's would be lost, but two d's definitely can combine to sound like one, and this sort of thing is common and natural. We link, or connect, our words together when we speak. The same consonant sound spoken two times consecutively often sounds like one consonant sound. This is why past tense verbs that end in "ed" are sometimes only recognized in context: I walked to the store. I walk to the store every morning.

    The term "guide dog" can easily sound like "guy dog" to someone who has never heard of a "guide dog". I would refer to what the student from China posted in this conversation.

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/ask-teacher/105225-guide-dog-seeing-eye-dog-2.html#post519510

    I walked to the store. I walk to the store every morning. - - I taught a radiologist from Pamplona, Spain who needed some clarification on this. The present sounded like the past, and the past sounded like the present sometimes. This left him in doubt as to how to speak. I cleared up his doubts and created a pronuniciation lesson which I've published online at www.esleflpages.com.
    Last edited by PROESL; 28-Sep-2009 at 02:21.

  9. #19
    konungursvia's Avatar
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    We call them guide dogs here too.

  10. #20
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    Re: "guide dog" and "Seeing Eye dog"

    This has to do with regular past tense verbs, which, of course, end wiht "ed" and are followed by /t/ or /d/, bhaisahab. How about a thank-you for this post?

    ed linking.pdf


    I'll come up with another page to highlight items such as "guide dog" and "guy dog".

    This sort of thing is crucial when students have to recognize "I'd do that for sure" and not think that the speaker is saying "I do that for sure". Or maybe one would say a contraction is not likely there. A contraction could very well be likely here: "I'dthink about it". It's very easy to speak at a normal speed and combine the d and the t, and it would sound like either the t or d is lost, or at least one of them would not be heard. The technical terms are T deletion and D deletion. This has to do with linking. These terms are found in Teaching Pronunciation published by Cambridge University Press. This has everything to do with linking and two Ds sounding like one D. Some students, in my opinion, could be slow to pick up on "would" in the second conditional because very often we use a contraction. Considering that some language is learned and studied and some language is acquired through exposure and practice, this is very important.

    PROESL uses Trebuchet MS

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