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Thread: Crescendo

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    Default Crescendo

    Crescendo (noun.sing.)Crescendos(noun pl.)(C,U) I think this word's sound & meaning is beautiful but wondering a little bit whether it could be used in place of "gradual/gradually" in any cases apart from some kind of music thing. Just like these following sentences:
    1) Gradually, children began to understand what they did was extremely wrong and effected us all.
    2) The weather gradually improved.
    3)The advertising campaign reached a crescendo just before Christmas.
    4)(A gradual increase in noise )Voices rose in a crescendo and drowned him out.

    PS May be they couldn't be interchanged with one another at all cos' gradual/gradually & crescendo are different in their part of speech act.I just guess,but am not sure whether it's right. Clarify me please.
    Last edited by phorntita; 25-Sep-2009 at 11:49. Reason: more information added

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    -endo = -ing. Crescendo = growing; so your example 4 is OK, but not 3. A 'crescendo' isn't the loudest point, it's a gradual increase. I'm not sure what your examples 1 & 2 are there for; they're both OK (apart from the spelling of 'affected'), but you couldn't use 'crescendo' in either case.

    b

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    -endo = -ing. Crescendo = growing; so your example 4 is OK, but not 3. A 'crescendo' isn't the loudest point, it's a gradual increase. I'm not sure what your examples 1 & 2 are there for; they're both OK (apart from the spelling of 'affected'), but you couldn't use 'crescendo' in either case.

    b
    Thank you BobK All of my examples come from 'Macmillan English Dictionary" Could you please give me only one of the example using this word "crescendo" when not involved talking about music ?
    Last edited by phorntita; 26-Sep-2009 at 02:20. Reason: sth added

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    Quote Originally Posted by phorntita View Post
    Thank you BobK All of my examples come from 'Macmillan English Dictionary" Could you please give me only one of the example using this word "crescendo" when not involved talking about music ?
    'In the press during the last few days there has been a crescendo of warnings about the second wave of the Swine Flu.'

    As well as music, 'crescendo' can be used of things that make - or can be felt to make (like press comments) - a sound. Some users may refer to things like 'a crescendo of activity', but that usage is not common and a lot of people would feel that it was mistaken.

    b

    PS And your example 2 would be OK if it referred to a change in the weather that made a noise: 'As the sky darkened, there was a crescendo of rainfall'.
    Last edited by BobK; 26-Sep-2009 at 18:40. Reason: Added PS

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    Quote Originally Posted by phorntita View Post
    Crescendo (noun.sing.)Crescendos(noun pl.)(C,U) I think this word's sound & meaning is beautiful but wondering a little bit whether it could be used in place of "gradual/gradually" in any cases apart from some kind of music thing. Just like these following sentences:
    1) Gradually, children began to understand what they did was extremely wrong and effected us all.
    2) The weather gradually improved.
    3)The advertising campaign reached a crescendo just before Christmas.
    4)(A gradual increase in noise )Voices rose in a crescendo and drowned him out.

    PS May be they couldn't be interchanged with one another at all cos' gradual/gradually & crescendo are different in their part of speech act.I just guess,but am not sure whether it's right. Clarify me please.
    In music, a crescendo is a gradual or steady increase in volume. In general, a crescendo is a steady increase in intensity or force. The phrase "reach a crescendo" is wrong because a "crescendo" is not a point at which an increase in force or volume stops. A crescendo is the increase or force in volume - not the point at which the increase stops.

    The word crescendo is not interchangeable with the word "gradually".

    3)The advertising campaign reached a crescendo just before Christmas. - This is an example of using "crescendo" incorrectly.

    crescendo: Definition from Answers.com

    Usage Problem. The climactic point or moment after such a progression: "The attacks ... began in December ... and reached a crescendo during (Foreign Affairs).

    4)(A gradual increase in noise )Voices rose in a crescendo and drowned him out. - This could be read as redundant because the word "crescendo" already refers to a rise in volume. We could take a rise in volume to be gradual and not all at once or immediate.

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'In the press during the last few days there has been a crescendo of warnings about the second wave of the Swine Flu.'

    As well as music, 'crescendo' can be used of things that make - or can be felt to make (like press comments) - a sound. Some users may refer to things like 'a crescendo of activity', but that usage is not common and a lot of people would feel that it was mistaken.

    b

    PS And your example 2 would be OK if it referred to a change in the weather that made a noise: 'As the sky darkened, there was a crescendo of rainfall'.
    Thank you very much Bobk

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    Default Re: Crescendo

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    In music, a crescendo is a gradual or steady increase in volume. In general, a crescendo is a steady increase in intensity or force. The phrase "reach a crescendo" is wrong because a "crescendo" is not a point at which an increase in force or volume stops. A crescendo is the increase or force in volume - not the point at which the increase stops.

    The word crescendo is not interchangeable with the word "gradually".

    3)The advertising campaign reached a crescendo just before Christmas. - This is an example of using "crescendo" incorrectly.

    crescendo: Definition from Answers.com

    Usage Problem. The climactic point or moment after such a progression: "The attacks ... began in December ... and reached a crescendo during (Foreign Affairs).

    4)(A gradual increase in noise )Voices rose in a crescendo and drowned him out. - This could be read as redundant because the word "crescendo" already refers to a rise in volume. We could take a rise in volume to be gradual and not all at once or immediate.
    Thank you very much PROESL-steve

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