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  1. #1
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default recommend somebody to do something?

    Hi,teachers.
    In the CCTV International programme Rediscovering China of September 24, I heard the New Yorker host saying to a foreign interviewee at the beginning of the programme, "Would you recommend other people to come to Urumqi?" As I doubted the correctness of the sentence structure of "recommend somebody to do something", I consulted my physical Longman dictionary without any delay, but I got no such use at the entry "recommend". However, when I googled "recommend" afterwards, I got numberous search results like "We recommend you to come to our congress." The dictionary I am using is Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (1995 Edition). So, my question is: Do I need to get a new bigger dictionary right now?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    Last edited by ohmyrichard; 28-Sep-2009 at 01:33.

  2. #2
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Hi,teachers.
    In the CCTV International programme Rediscovering China of September 24, I heard the New Yorker host saying to a foreign interviewee at the beginning of the programme, "Would you recommend other people to come to Urumqi?" As I doubted the correctness of the sentence structure of "recommend somebody to do something", I consulted my physical Longman dictionary without any delay, but I got no such use at the entry "recommend". However, when I googled "recommend" afterwards, I got numberous search result like "We recommend you to come to our congress." The dictionary I am using is Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (1995 Edition). So, my question is: Do I need to get a new bigger dictionary right now?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    I would always say "I recommend THAT you do something" in a case like that.

    I might say, "I recommend Eddy's Diner for late-night coffee," but that's a different usage.

    I don't know why you'd need a new dictionary when you have Google. Anyway, Google is always going to be
    more current than any published book at all, so there's no use trying to buy a book that contains items that
    were posted on the web for the first time almost "yesterday."

    In addition, Google and dictionaries are making different captures, so I think they supplement each other
    no matter what dictionary you have.

  3. #3
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I would always say "I recommend THAT you do something" in a case like that.

    I might say, "I recommend Eddy's Diner for late-night coffee," but that's a different usage.

    I don't know why you'd need a new dictionary when you have Google. Anyway, Google is always going to be
    more current than any published book at all, so there's no use trying to buy a book that contains items that
    were posted on the web for the first time almost "yesterday."

    In addition, Google and dictionaries are making different captures, so I think they supplement each other
    no matter what dictionary you have.
    Thanks a lot, Ann1977. I also find Google very convenient to use, but in some cases, it takes me a lot of time to decide whether certain search results are sentences, articles, or books produced by native speakers of English. Oftentimes I find what many nonnatives say or write in terms of accuracy in usage of English words or sentence structures is not acceptable to native speakers of English although it can be understood. So, in this sense, Google can sometimes be very inconvenient to me and perhaps many nonnative learners of English like me.
    It seems a better idea that I use my physical dictionaries, online dictionaries and Google search function combinedly. Oh, can I say "use things combinedly"?
    Thanks again.
    Richard

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    You will never find a dictionary that lists all of the ways a word can be used with examples of each. A dictionary will generally not tell you which prepositions a word can be used with with.
    A dictionary is primarily a book that tells you the meanings of words, not how to use them - although this second function is found, in a small way, in most of the bigger dictionaries.

  5. #5
    ohmyrichard is offline Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You will never find a dictionary that lists all of the ways a word can be used with examples of each. A dictionary will generally not tell you which prepositions a word can be used with with.
    A dictionary is primarily a book that tells you the meanings of words, not how to use them - although this second function is found, in a small way, in most of the bigger dictionaries.
    Thanks for teaching me to understand the functions of the general purpose dictionary properly.
    Richard

  6. #6
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Thanks a lot, Ann1977. I also find Google very convenient to use, but in some cases, it takes me a lot of time to decide whether certain search results are sentences, articles, or books produced by native speakers of English. Oftentimes I find what many nonnatives say or write in terms of accuracy in usage of English words or sentence structures is not acceptable to native speakers of English although it can be understood. So, in this sense, Google can sometimes be very inconvenient to me and perhaps many nonnative learners of English like me.
    It seems a better idea that I use my physical dictionaries, online dictionaries and Google search function combinedly. Oh, can I say "use things combinedly"?
    Thanks again.
    Richard
    Well, Richard ~

    This paragraph puts you well above the need for a simple dictionary, that's for sure. This passage would be impressive in a native speaker.

    But I wouldn't say "combinedly."

  7. #7
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Hi,teachers.
    In the CCTV International programme Rediscovering China of September 24, I heard the New Yorker host saying to a foreign interviewee at the beginning of the programme, "Would you recommend other people to come to Urumqi?" As I doubted the correctness of the sentence structure of "recommend somebody to do something", I consulted my physical Longman dictionary without any delay, but I got no such use at the entry "recommend". However, when I googled "recommend" afterwards, I got numberous search result like "We recommend you to come to our congress." The dictionary I am using is Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (1995 Edition). So, my question is: Do I need to get a new bigger dictionary right now?
    Thanks.
    Richard

    Besides, what's the use of a dictionary that tells you (quite correctly) that "they" is a plural pronoun if the actual PEOPLE are actually SAYING "If any student misses an exam, they will have to apply to the professor for permission to make it up."

  8. #8
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by ohmyrichard View Post
    Hi,teachers.
    In the CCTV International programme Rediscovering China of September 24, I heard the New Yorker host saying to a foreign interviewee at the beginning of the programme, "Would you recommend other people to come to Urumqi?" As I doubted the correctness of the sentence structure of "recommend somebody to do something", I consulted my physical Longman dictionary without any delay, but I got no such use at the entry "recommend". However, when I googled "recommend" afterwards, I got numberous search result like "We recommend you to come to our congress." The dictionary I am using is Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English (1995 Edition). So, my question is: Do I need to get a new bigger dictionary right now?
    Thanks.
    Richard
    It might be good to use the variety of dictionaries that are online. The HyperDictionary shows you so much about a word that it can give you a headache. But if you're looking for thoroughness, it could do the job. I caution you, however, that it really can be too much sometimes.

    Dictionaries

    American Heritage Dictionary
    Cambridge ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary Pictures
    Heinle's ESL Dictionary\
    Macmillan ESL Dictionary
    HyperDictionary

  9. #9
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It might be good to use the variety of dictionaries that are online. The HyperDictionary shows you so much about a word that it can give you a headache. But if you're looking for thoroughness, it could do the job. I caution you, however, that it really can be too much sometimes.

    Dictionaries

    American Heritage Dictionary
    Cambridge ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary
    Longman ESL Dictionary Pictures
    Heinle's ESL Dictionary\
    Macmillan ESL Dictionary
    HyperDictionary
    That's a good suggestion.

    I always at least check out "uses on the web" (or whatever it's called) whenever a Google search offers it. I like to see a whole lot of uses in a lot of different contexts.

    I imagine, though, that an English learner's interest in dictionaries and usage examples is from a perspective that is not entirely overlapping.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: recommend somebody to do something?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Besides, what's the use of a dictionary that tells you (quite correctly) that "they" is a plural pronoun if the actual PEOPLE are actually SAYING "If any student misses an exam, they will have to apply to the professor for permission to make it up."

    Good question.

    they: Definition from Answers.com

    USAGE NOTE The use of the third-person plural pronoun they to refer to a singular noun or pronoun is attested as early as 1300 ...

    Grammar myths debunked, 04-15-02

    Myth 3: "They" must never occur with a singular antecedent.
    Pullum: "They" is standardly used with quantified noun phrase antecedents like "everyone," "no one," and "anybody."So sentences like "Nobody likes paying their taxes" are perfectly grammatical English, and this use has been common for hundreds of years.With other kinds of antecedent, "they" is less likely, but does occur and is becoming more frequent.

    I think he says something about this in this article.

    Many prescriptive rules are just plain dumb and should be deleted from the usage handbooks. - Steven Pinker, from The Language Instinct

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