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  1. #1
    vil is offline VIP Member
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    at peace/beaten the odds/by all ods/run short/bare-knuckled

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The Pilgrims had much to celebrate, they had built homes in the wilderness, they had raised enough crops to keep them alive during the long coming winter, they were at peace with their Indian neighbors.
    at peace = in a state of agreement or friendliness, not at strife or war

    They have beaten the odds and it was time to celebrate.
    beat the odds = brake the ice = a colloquial phrase used to denote a time in an individual's life where they have to dig deep in order to overcome tremendous personal adversity.
    beat the odds = to break the neck of a task; get out of a difficulty

    I am by all odds the best player on the team.
    By all odds the Bible is the best book of the year.
    by all odds = by far; this idiom uses odds in the sense of "the amount by which one thing excels or exceeds; no doubt; doubtless

    We have to face with heavy odds against us.
    heavy odds = definitely superiority; far superiority

    During the year they had also shared their stored food with newcomers and the pilgrims ran short of food.
    run short = use something up so that a supply runs out or becomes insufficient

    But in that initial bid for political office, Obama quickly mastered the bare-knuckle arts of Chicago electoral politics.
    bare-knuckle(d) = characterized by a fiercely, unrelenting or implacable character

    I was overcome with sleep.
    I was overcome by nausea after eating octopus.
    She was filled with nausea at the sight of cruelty to animals.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 27-Sep-2009 at 12:31.

  2. #2
    sarat_106 is offline Key Member
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    Exclamation Re: at peace/beaten the odds/by all ods/run short/bare-knuckled

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am on the right track by the interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    The Pilgrims had much to celebrate, they had built homes in the wilderness, they had raised enough crops to keep them alive during the long coming winter, they were at peace with their Indian neighbors.
    at peace = in a state of agreement or friendliness, not at strife or war, perfectly Ok

    They have beaten the odds and it was time to celebrate.
    beat the odds = brake the ice = a colloquial phrase used to denote a time in an individual's life where they have to dig deep in order to overcome tremendous personal adversity.
    beat the odds = to break the neck of a task; get out of a difficulty= become winners in life by overcoming the challenges, setbacks, or obstacles in the society

    I am by all odds the best player on the team.
    By all odds the Bible is the best book of the year.
    by all odds = by far; this idiom uses odds in the sense of "the amount by which one thing excels or exceeds; no doubt; doubtless Ok

    We have to face with heavy odds against us, in fighting economic recession
    heavy odds = definitely superiority; far superiority In the present context it means:overwhelming opposition = a difficult challenge = it is unlikely

    During the year they had also shared their stored food with newcomers and the pilgrims ran short of food.
    run short = use something up so that a supply runs out or becomes insufficient Ok

    But in that initial bid for political office, Obama quickly mastered the bare-knuckle arts of Chicago electoral politics.
    bare-knuckle(d) = characterized by a fiercely, unrelenting or implacable character This is an American slang

    I was overcome with/by sleep. Ok, I think by sounds better
    I was overcome by nausea after eating octopus.OK
    She was filled with nausea at the sight of cruelty to animals.OK

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    SKP

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