Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36
  1. #1
    M56 Guest

    Default Subtlety and prepositions.

    Why do people generally say "to sit in front of the TV" but "to be at the PC"?

    Why we use "in front of the TV" and not "at the TV"?
    Last edited by M56; 28-Feb-2005 at 08:00. Reason: To expand on the question.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,688
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    'At' for activity????

  3. #3
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    'At' for activity????
    Yes, I think so. Productive vs non-productive.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,688
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    We also say 'at my desk', which was what made me go for it.

  5. #5
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    We also say 'at my desk', which was what made me go for it.
    Yes, I see. Apparently, the most common words that precede "in front of" are: sprawled, plonked, curled up, lounge, cosily installed, and vegetate (the main one being "slumped")

    I wonder what they are for "at the/my computer"?
    Last edited by M56; 24-Feb-2005 at 15:50.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,688
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    I'm surprised 'chilling' hasn't started appearing.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    Yes, I see. Apparently, the most common words that precede "in front of" are: sprawled, plonked, curled up, lounge, cosily installed, and vegetate (the main one being "slumped")

    I wonder what they are for "at the/my computer"?
    glued to the computer
    to sit on the computer
    remain semi comatosed in front of the computer
    to do armchair surfing
    to be under mouse arrest
    to have a bad case of "Dorrito" Syndrome"
    glazing (Corporate-slang for sleeping with your eyes open)
    mouse potatoe syndrome
    go online
    to have a date with a square headed girl/friend/boyfriend

    Also, you can still be plonked in front of the computer as well. (same as TV)

  8. #8
    M56 Guest

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marylin
    glued to the computer
    to sit on the computer
    remain semi comatosed in front of the computer
    to do armchair surfing
    to be under mouse arrest
    to have a bad case of "Dorrito" Syndrome"
    glazing (Corporate-slang for sleeping with your eyes open)
    mouse potatoe syndrome
    go online
    to have a date with a square headed girl/friend/boyfriend

    Also, you can still be plonked in front of the computer as well. (same as TV)
    Fine , Marilyn, but none of those collocate with "at my computer". I haven't heard "plonked in front of my computer". Do you think the person was doing a productive act when plonked?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    959
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Quote Originally Posted by M56
    Fine , Marilyn, but none of those collocate with "at my computer". I haven't heard "plonked in front of my computer". Do you think the person was doing a productive act when plonked?
    This term is used where I live.

    You can plonk a kid in front of the computer and tell him to do his homework.
    The result will be productive.

  10. #10
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    42,688
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Subtlety and prepositions.

    Unless, he ignores your order and heads for a game site.

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •