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  1. #1
    dulceluna Guest

    Default extrovert vs extroverted

    Hi, I need to know what is the difference of usage between extrovert and extroverted. Is it ok to say Iīm quite extroverted, because i have read a sentence in a studentīs book saying Iīm quite extrovert.What should be the correct one...I appreciate your helping me.

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    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Quote Originally Posted by dulceluna View Post
    Hi, I need to know what is the difference of usage between extrovert and extroverted. Is it ok to say Iīm quite extroverted, because i have read a sentence in a studentīs book saying Iīm quite extrovert.What should be the correct one...I appreciate your helping me.

    "I'm quite extrovert" is not used.

    You can say, "I'm quite extroverted" or "I'm quite the extrovert."

    "Extroverted" is an adjective and "extrovert" is a noun.

    You can't say, "I'm quite student," but you can say, "I'm quite the student" or "I'm quite studious."

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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Note that "quite the student" and such constructions are playful, the norm being "quite a student."

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    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Note that "quite the student" and such constructions are playful, the norm being "quite a student."
    Really! I didn't know that.

    I know that there are playful applications of the expression, such as "quite the lad," but I never thought of the basic expression as one playfully derived from a more standard one.

    What about these:

    "He's very much the Big Man About Town, isn't he."

    "Well, quite the loser so far in this game!"
    Last edited by Ann1977; 30-Sep-2009 at 03:14.

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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Yes, it's a form of hyperbole based on the idea of superlatives. "Quite the hostess" is the superlative of quite a hostess. Isn't it?

    In fact, I am pretty sure of it. There was a time (you seem too young) before people started using that phrase, I think in the eighties.

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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Quote Originally Posted by dulceluna View Post
    Hi, I need to know what is the difference of usage between extrovert and extroverted. Is it ok to say Iīm quite extroverted, because i have read a sentence in a studentīs book saying Iīm quite extrovert.What should be the correct one...I appreciate your helping me.
    Note that Eysenck's original words were extravert and introvert.
    extra - out; intro - in.
    These are still the official spellings in psychology and the cognitive sciences.
    If you are an extravert, you are extraverted.

    Dictionaries often give extrovert as a variant. No doubt this spelling has caught on because the vowel isn't stressed. No one would say 'extropolated', 'extroneous", etc.

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    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Yes, it's a form of hyperbole based on the idea of superlatives. "Quite the hostess" is the superlative of quite a hostess. Isn't it?

    In fact, I am pretty sure of it. There was a time (you seem too young) before people started using that phrase, I think in the eighties.
    Okay, good to know.

    "Quite the little lady" and similar phrases have always seemed standard to me.

    I suppose you're right that it's derived from "Quite a little lady." I guess I just assumed that these two expressions meant somewhat different things (not particularly a superlative.)

    What about this:
    "Do people still have high tea in London?"
    "Oh, yes indeed. It's quite the thing."

    That's a use that can't take "quite a thing" as a replacement.

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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    In that case thing is not a very good word choice -- a degree of expression we'd expect among teens, I'd say. "Quite the shit" doesn't work either, nor does "Siiiiiiiick!"

    How about "tradition?'

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    Default Re: extrovert vs extroverted

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    In that case thing is not a very good word choice -- a degree of expression we'd expect among teens, I'd say. "Quite the shit" doesn't work either, nor does "Siiiiiiiick!" Nor does "quite da booomb!"

    How about "tradition?' That would work: Quite the tradition. Quite a tradition.
    ....added some

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