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Thread: Plosive Sounds

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    Exclamation Plosive Sounds

    Hi,

    There are 6 plosive sounds, /P/, /B/, /K/, /G/, /T/, /D/
    Plosive sounds are said to be characterized by explosion of air (plosive) or gush of air coming out at the time of outterance.
    This is true for /P/, /K/, /T/ for the unvoiced consonants, but for /G/, /B/, /D/ voiced consonants outterance is not marked with any gush of air, thus why are they classified as Plosives?

    Thanks

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    There are 6 plosive sounds, /P/, /B/, /K/, /G/, /T/, /D/
    Plosive sounds are said to be characterized by explosion of air (plosive) or gush of air coming out at the time of outterance.
    This is true for /P/, /K/, /T/ for the unvoiced consonants, but for /G/, /B/, /D/ voiced consonants outterance is not marked with any gush of air, thus why are they classified as Plosives?

    Thanks

    The b,d,g are aspirated (exploded, as you say). Compare the Hindi letters
    प फ .... त थ ....ट ठ ....क ख
    ब भ ....द ध ....ड ढ ....ग घ

    The second consonant in each set in aspirated, unless I am very much mistaken.
    b - d - g - (roughly; although from my recordings I'd put the English voiced consonants somewhere between the pair).
    Also, the d is alveolar, not dental or retroflex.
    You are probably saying for b, which is not really right at the beginning of a word. It has at least some aspiration.

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    The b,d,g are aspirated (exploded, as you say). Compare the Hindi letters
    प फ .... त थ ....ट ठ ....क ख
    ब भ ....द ध ....ड ढ ....ग घ

    The second consonant in each set in aspirated, unless I am very much mistaken.
    b - d - g - (roughly; although from my recordings I'd put the English voiced consonants somewhere between the pair).
    Also, the d is alveolar, not dental or retroflex.
    You are probably saying for b, which is not really right at the beginning of a word. It has at least some aspiration.
    My question was regarding English consonant sounds.

    You seem to be phonetics expert and possess a lot of knowledge about Hindi consonant sounds as well. I am supprized as well as happy.

    Can you please explain, the difference between English and Hindi consonants?

    are

    /फ/ /P/
    /ख/ /K/
    /ठ/ /T/

    these sounds similar?

    What are the differences?

    I know /ठ/ is a palatal sound however /T/ is a alveolar sound.

    Is there any consonant sound in Hindi which is exactly similar to an English consonant sound?

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    My question was regarding English consonant sounds.
    Well, I hope I answered you answer about English consonants by comparing b, d, and g, to consonants that you know.


    Can you please explain, the difference between English and Hindi consonants?

    are

    /फ/ /P/ Pretty much the same, assuming P is initial and aspirated.
    /ख/ /K/ Pretty much the same, assuming K is initial and aspirated.
    /ठ/ /T/ Pretty much the same, assuming T is initial and aspirated, but an English T is not retroflex.

    these sounds similar? Yes, with those provisos. I would pronounce P somewhere between you aspirated /फ/ and , Same with the others

    I know /ठ/ is a palatal sound however /T/ is a alveolar sound.
    That's right. ठ is retroflex, or palatal, as you say.

    Is there any consonant sound in Hindi which is exactly similar to an English consonant sound?
    र स म य ह श ष फ़ च ज़ ज न व are close
    r, s, m, y, h, sh, f, ch, z, j n v
    We don't have you retroflex or dental sounds.
    All of your vowels correspond to one or more of ours.
    The P B, T D, K G are close enough. Aspirate them at the beginning of a word of syllable, but not elsewhere.

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    र स म य ह श ष फ़ च ज़ ज न व are close
    r, s, m, y, h, sh, f, ch, z, j n v
    We don't have you retroflex or dental sounds.
    All of your vowels correspond to one or more of ours.
    The P B, T D, K G are close enough. Aspirate them at the beginning of a word of syllable, but not elsewhere.
    Is /Th/ not a dental sound?

    The /V/ and /व/ are not the same, /व/ does not have the friction element attached to it, as it is the case with /V/.

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Is /Th/ not a dental sound?

    The /V/ and /व/ are not the same, /व/ does not have the friction element attached to it, as it is the case with /V/.
    I have also been told that /Ch/ and /च/ are not similar, though I am not really aware of the difference and perhaps you might be able to throw some light on it.

    I think /Ch/ is a sibilant however /च/ is not, am I correct?

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    There are 6 plosive sounds, /P/, /B/, /K/, /G/, /T/, /D/
    Plosive sounds are said to be characterized by explosion of air (plosive) or gush of air coming out at the time of outterance.
    This is true for /P/, /K/, /T/ for the unvoiced consonants, but for /G/, /B/, /D/ voiced consonants outterance is not marked with any gush of air, thus why are they classified as Plosives?

    Thanks
    Plosives are also called "stop sounds" because one is forced to close the vocal cords in order to begin another word or another sound. ELLs sometimes have difficulty going from a plosive to another sound unless the plosive sound is able to connect, or link, easily to the next sound.

    The "ed" in regular past verbs can be difficult. For example, "k", which I call a stop sound, can be difficult when followed by the "t" sound in "worked". This is not easy at first for some ELLs: kt

    However, this is easier: Do you work_late every day? The "k" sound easily connects, or links, to the "l" sound, which is a continuant.

    With "p" and "b", decrease your volume a little, or tilt your head away from the mic a little. It's probably better to not be so "plosive" with "p" and "b" when speaking into the mic.



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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    There are 6 plosive sounds, /P/, /B/, /K/, /G/, /T/, /D/
    Plosive sounds are said to be characterized by explosion of air (plosive) or gush of air coming out at the time of outterance.
    This is true for /P/, /K/, /T/ for the unvoiced consonants, but for /G/, /B/, /D/ voiced consonants outterance is not marked with any gush of air, thus why are they classified as Plosives?

    Thanks
    I think perhaps you are confusing the release of air that occurs with all stops (at least pulmonic ones) with the distinct phenomenon of aspiration. The former characterizes plosives in general, the latter (which would seem to be the "gush of air" you are referring to) only aspirates.

    (Disclaimer: I am not a phonetics expert)

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Is /Th/ not a dental sound?

    The /V/ and /व/ are not the same, /व/ does not have the friction element attached to it, as it is the case with /V/.
    /th/ is interdental. It's called dental on the charts.

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    Default Re: Plosive Sounds

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    /th/ is interdental. It's called dental on the charts.
    Yes, thats what I have read, /th/ as dental, the term Interdental is new to me...

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