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  1. #1
    astra is offline Newbie
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    Default Looking for English equivalents to these

    Hi, everyone,

    I am looking for English idiomatic equivalents to these:
    1. context: a thief evades a very experienced detective. The detective exclaims: "I am such an experienced detective, I have figured out so many criminals of sorts and kinds, and here we are : such a tiny, puny thief makes a fool out of me."
    What I am looking for an English idiom that expresses detective's frustration. In Russian they say something like " I am such an old dog ( i.e., experienced) and allowed myself to be deceived like that". How to say the same in English?

    2. Another idiom/word has to do with one's nerves that become so thin that even a slight disturbance puts one on edge. What idiom/word/expression can I use to describe such nerves? In Russian they say something like " these nerves of mine are good for nothing"

    I will appreciate any help.
    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Looking for English equivalents to these

    We have pull the wool over someone's eyes when they're fooled and should have known better.

  3. #3
    chipbray is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Looking for English equivalents to these

    For the 1st request: this is a tough one.
    No exact idiom referring to this situation (too experienced to have made this mistake) comes to mind. There are many idioms for an experienced person. You could combine those with the 2nd part of your phrase (allowed myself to be deceived like that, or something similar).

    The detective has "been around the block" too many times for that to happen.

    "This is not my first rodeo" and I was still deceived.

    The detective was an "old hand" but the thief still escaped.


    For the 2nd request:
    English idiom for: one's nerves that become so thin that even a slight disturbance puts one on edge.
    This is a much easier one. There are many idioms for this situation:

    Frayed nerves - "my nerves are really frayed"

    That guy is really "touchy". I asked him a question, and he became angry.

    "I'm down to my last nerve"

    Leave him alone, he's "about to blow"

    To be "at the breaking point"

    a "bundle of nerves"

    "all wound up"

    "uptight"

    there are many, many more

  4. #4
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    Raymott is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Looking for English equivalents to these

    2.
    I'm a nervous wreck.
    My nerves are shot.
    I feel like I'm on the verge of a nervous breakdown.

  5. #5
    benmoore is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Looking for English equivalents to these

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    We have pull the wool over someone's eyes when they're fooled and should have known better.
    Yes. Another common phrasing is "he really pulled one over on me".

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