Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    muriel28 is offline Newbie
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    1
    Post Thanks / Like

    about "a bit too much"

    I would like some examples with this idiom. does it translate "en faire trop" ? and how to build this kind of sentence ?

  2. #2
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,063
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: about "a bit too much"

    Quote Originally Posted by muriel28 View Post
    I would like some examples with this idiom. does it translate "en faire trop" ? and how to build this kind of sentence ?
    Since I don't speak French well enough to offer any sort of translation, Muriel, let me just give you some examples.

    Even when the amount is much too much, we often use "a bit too much" to be more polite.

    A: [brings B three scoops of ice cream] Here you are. Enjoy!

    B: Ohhh, that a bit too much ice cream for me. Two scoops is even a bit too much. If it's not too much trouble, could you take back a scoop and a half?

    +++++++++++++++++++++++

    A: Do you want a full glass of milk?

    B: No, that's a bit too much for me. Please give me just three quarter's of a glass.

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,881
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: about "a bit too much"

    As used by riverkid, this is not an idiom. It simply means what it says.
    I'm not really sure it has idiomatic status.
    However, there are some slightly less concrete examples of the use.
    I can't stand Brittany Spears. She's immature and over the top. I'm afraid she's a bit too much for me.
    Are you going to wear that purple top with the yellow stripes? Isn't it maybe a bit too much for church?

  4. #4
    riverkid is offline Banned
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    3,063
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: about "a bit too much"

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    As used by riverkid, this is not an idiom. It simply means what it says.
    I'm not really sure it has idiomatic status.
    However, there are some slightly less concrete examples of the use.
    I can't stand Brittany Spears. She's immature and over the top. I'm afraid she's a bit too much for me.
    Are you going to wear that purple top with the yellow stripes? Isn't it maybe a bit too much for church?
    I agree, Raymott, it's not an idiom in the sense of the second part of 2, but it is idiomatic, and therefore idiom, in the sense of the first part of 2.


    ==========
    M-W

    idiom
    2 : an expression in the usage of a language that is peculiar to itself either grammatically (as no, it wasn't me) or in having a meaning that cannot be derived from the conjoined meanings of its elements (as Monday week for “the Monday a week after next Monday”)

    ===============

Similar Threads

  1. "a bit," "a little" and "a little bit"
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22-Sep-2009, 01:45
  2. "a wrinkled shirt" and "a rumpled shirt"
    By Daruma in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Aug-2009, 06:53
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Jun-2009, 21:10
  4. teaching "a lot", "little", "a little", "very little"
    By kitty yee in forum Teaching English
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2006, 14:51
  5. When do we use "a few" and "few", "a little" "little"
    By Vincents_Genesius_Evans in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2005, 02:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •