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  1. #1
    Anonymous Guest

    Default Cockney Rhyming Slang

    Would it be shiny and bright to have a Cockney rhyming slang thread here?

    I'm looking forward to calling someone a merry old soul one of these days. :P


    Me old dutch, why don't we have a key with some London rhyming slang?

    key = I made that one up myself. Can anyone figure it out?


    8) :)

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    am I looking for a rhyme with 'thread'?

  3. #3
    Anonymous Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    am I looking for a rhyme with 'thread'?
    The rhyme is associated with key. I'm thinking about what we put a key into in order to open a door. That's where the rhyme is.

    I could never figure any out. I'd have to take a course in rhyming slang.

    8)

  4. #4
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default

    Key hole = Poll
    Red5
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  5. #5
    gwendolinest Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    am I looking for a rhyme with 'thread'?
    Butter and bread?

    ()

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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  7. #7
    Anonymous Guest

    Default

    The rhyme is with "lock and key". Talk rhymes with lock.

    have a key = have a talk

    Come to think of it, I just remembered that when considering BE accents/pronunciation, some BE speakers might not consider that "lock" rhymes with "talk". Does "lock" rhyme with "talk" in BE? In AE they rhyme.

    If not, I'll call this American rhyming slang.

    8) :)

  8. #8
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by TALKtown
    The rhyme is with "lock and key". Talk rhymes with lock.

    have a key = have a talk

    Come to think of it, I just remembered that when considering BE accents/pronunciation, some BE speakers might not consider that "lock" rhymes with "talk". Does "lock" rhyme with "talk" in BE? In AE they rhyme.

    If not, I'll call this American rhyming slang.

    8) :)
    Lock rhymes with Stock

    Walk rhymes with Stalk

    Definitely an AE thread.
    Red5
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  9. #9
    Anonymous Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Red5
    Quote Originally Posted by TALKtown
    The rhyme is with "lock and key". Talk rhymes with lock.

    have a key = have a talk

    Come to think of it, I just remembered that when considering BE accents/pronunciation, some BE speakers might not consider that "lock" rhymes with "talk". Does "lock" rhyme with "talk" in BE? In AE they rhyme.

    If not, I'll call this American rhyming slang.

    8) :)
    Lock rhymes with Stock

    Walk rhymes with Stalk

    Definitely an AE thread.
    I'll try to come up with something that rhymes in AE and BE next time.


    Both lock and talk take a short o sound in AE. It's interesting and somewhat odd to me that in BE these two words aren't considered to be words that rhyme.

    Could we apply the term off rhyme or slant rhyme here? Let's not forget the off rhymes and the slant rhymes.

    I came across this in a trope glossary. However, here it is as defined by the AHD via Atomica. I had always thought of and considered this type of rhyme, but I never knew there could have been a name for it.

    off rhyme
    n.
    A partial or imperfect rhyme, often using assonance or consonance only, as in dry and died or grown and moon. Also called half rhyme, near rhyme; Also called oblique rhyme, slant rhyme.

  10. #10
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    I guess that definition fits (from a UK point of view). They are very close when pronounced, but are certainly not a perfect rhyme.

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