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  1. #11
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CitySpeak
    The rhyme is with "lock and key". Talk rhymes with lock.

    have a key = have a talk

    Come to think of it, I just remembered that when considering BE accents/pronunciation, some BE speakers might not consider that "lock" rhymes with "talk". Does "lock" rhyme with "talk" in BE? In AE they rhyme.

    If not, I'll call this American rhyming slang.

    8) :)
    talk: hawk, walk, stalk
    lock: dock, shock, mock, clock, cock, hock, knock, sock

    I would say that "lock" doesn't rhyme with "talk" in AE.

    8)

  2. #12
    Anonymous Guest

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    I would say that "lock" doesn't rhyme with "talk" in AE. <<<<


    I would say that "lock" does rhyme with "talk" in American English.

    As I talk now I can hear the rhyme. 'lock - talk'

    8) :D

  3. #13
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    I would say that "lock" does rhyme with "talk" in American English.
    Not the way I say it it doesn't. I have never heard it spoken that way either. And we do speak American English in St. Louis.

    ~R

    8)

  4. #14
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by CitySpeak
    I would say that "lock" doesn't rhyme with "talk" in AE. <<<<

    Then you must speak another language. As I speak at this very moment the words "lock" and "talk" I hear a rhyme. And if I ask anyone else here, I'm sure they will say the two words rhyme. This has nothing to do with regional variations in accent or pronunciation.

    I would say that "lock" does rhyme with "talk" in American English.
    It sounds as though you think every American has the same pronunciation as you, which I find hard to believe. Surely whether the two words rhyme is a personal thing? :? :D
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  5. #15
    Anonymous Guest

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    Okay. Overreaction.

    8) :wink:

  6. #16
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
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    8)
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  7. #17
    John D Guest

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    Go to any large store in Bristol UK and enquire where their toy department is. See just where you end up!!!....... That's right, in the tie dept.

  8. #18
    Samantha Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by John D
    Go to any large store in Bristol UK and enquire where their toy department is. See just where you end up!!!....... That's right, in the tie dept.
    My sister (we're from California) went to a grocery store in Arkansas and asked for Whoppers (they're a chocolate covered malt ball candy pronounced Wahppers) and the clerk took her to the windshield wippers (which I would pronounce why-pers).

  9. #19
    Samantha Guest

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    Can anyone explain how the Cockney Rhyming slang works? I understand the gist of it, but I never seem to be able to figure them out.

    Maybe I'm just pathetic at rhyming

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Samantha
    Can anyone explain how the Cockney Rhyming slang works? I understand the gist of it, but I never seem to be able to figure them out.

    Maybe I'm just pathetic at rhyming
    It's easy! :D

    Delete the first sound of a word, say, "dole" (welfare):

    dole => -ole

    Now think of another word that ends in "-ole".

    What about: Nat King Cole or Rock & Roll or Sausage roll. All of them refer to the dole in Cockney Rhyming Slang.

    Some of my favorites are:

    dollar for Oxford Scholar

    and

    trouble and strife for wife

    or

    hugs and kisses for the Mrs

    :D

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