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  1. #41
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Here is the menu from the Kashmir Restaurant. It is near where I live in Boston. Notice that samosas are 2 for $6!

    Kashmir Boston | Food Delivery | GrubHub.com
    Newbury Street

  2. #42
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Newbury Street
    Yup. Exactly. LOL!

    After a morning knocking yourself out looking at a little something in cashmere from Loro Piana and checking out the sunglasses at the Chanel Boutique, why -- you think two samosas for $6 is a positive bargain.

  3. #43
    dragn is offline Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    in - places with limitations, restrictions, or boundaries - in the city or in the office, for example
    Note that there are exceptions to this, however. For example, I can easily imagine someone saying the following:

    My train trip from St. Louis to Chicago took forever! I think the train stopped at every town along the way.

    Here, the speaker is thinking of those towns as mere points along a route. Of course, each of those towns has boundaries and limits; some may have populations of tens, even hundreds of thousands of people. But at the moment of speaking, those boundaries and limits are not being considered; they are irrelevant. At the moment of speaking, they are nothing but dots on a map.

    On the other hand, of course, the same speaker would say:

    I got off the train in Peoria and did some sightseeing.

    Clearly, now we are thinking of the city of Peoria as a place with
    limitations, restrictions, or boundaries and in is certainly the correct preposition, just as PROESL pointed out.

    Greg

    P.S. I'm sorry I can't connect this with the price of samosas in Boston...would you settle for the price of stinky tofu in Taipei?

  4. #44
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by dragn View Post
    Note that there are exceptions to this, however. For example, I can easily imagine someone saying the following:

    My train trip from St. Louis to Chicago took forever! I think the train stopped at every town along the way.

    Here, the speaker is thinking of those towns as mere points along a route. Of course, each of those towns has boundaries and limits; some may have populations of tens, even hundreds of thousands of people. But at the moment of speaking, those boundaries and limits are not being considered; they are irrelevant. At the moment of speaking, they are nothing but dots on a map.

    On the other hand, of course, the same speaker would say:

    I got off the train in Peoria and did some sightseeing.

    Clearly, now we are thinking of the city of Peoria as a place with
    limitations, restrictions, or boundaries and in is certainly the correct preposition, just as PROESL pointed out.

    Greg

    P.S. I'm sorry I can't connect this with the price of samosas in Boston...would you settle for the price of stinky tofu in Taipei?



    And btw -- that was a nice point about stopping AT Peoria.

    However I would like to caution everyone that getting off at Peoria is sure to be a mistake. Not so much a grammatical one -- more of a lifestyle error.

  5. #45
    konungursvia's Avatar
    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Here is the menu from the Kashmir Restaurant. It is near where I live in Boston. Notice that samosas are 2 for $6!

    Kashmir Boston | Food Delivery | GrubHub.com
    Holy cow. Samosas are 2 to 3 for a dollar here.

  6. #46
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by dragn View Post
    Note that there are exceptions to this, however. For example, I can easily imagine someone saying the following:

    My train trip from St. Louis to Chicago took forever! I think the train stopped at every town along the way.

    Here, the speaker is thinking of those towns as mere points along a route. Of course, each of those towns has boundaries and limits; some may have populations of tens, even hundreds of thousands of people. But at the moment of speaking, those boundaries and limits are not being considered; they are irrelevant. At the moment of speaking, they are nothing but dots on a map.

    On the other hand, of course, the same speaker would say:

    I got off the train in Peoria and did some sightseeing.

    Clearly, now we are thinking of the city of Peoria as a place with limitations, restrictions, or boundaries and in is certainly the correct preposition, just as PROESL pointed out.

    Greg

    P.S. I'm sorry I can't connect this with the price of samosas in Boston...would you settle for the price of stinky tofu in Taipei?

    I understand that you mean, but I don't think this is really an exception. I think it has to do with a speaker's viewpoint. It's easy to view the towns as points on a line in this case.

    My train trip from St. Louis to Chicago took forever! I think the train stopped at every town along the way.


    We use at for locations or points on a line. So that's a regular or normal use of at.

    It's possible to say "I think the train stopped in every town.", but given that the train travels on a track, which is a line, the towns are very easily viewed as points on that line. This is how we can explain the use of "at" in this sentence.
    Last edited by PROESL; 12-Oct-2009 at 03:48.

  7. #47
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I understand that you mean, but I don't think this is really an exception. I think it has to do with a speaker's viewpoint. It's easy to view the towns as points on a line in this case.

    My train trip from St. Louis to Chicago took forever! I think the train stopped at every town along the way.


    We use at for locations or points on a line. So that's a regular or normal use of at.

    It's possible to say "I think the train stopped in every town.", but given the train travels on a track, which is a line, the towns are very easily viewed as points on that line. This is how we can explain the use of "at" in this sentence.
    I think dragn is confirming your point, demonstrating that even the apparent exceptions (such as "at Peoria") are not exceptions -- for the exact reason that you adduce here.

    I have to say, PROESL, that I have always been fond of prepositional phrases since the day I saw the point instantly in the third grade -- ("The ships in the harbor (is)(are) ready to sail." See? I even remember the exact sentence! And my exact reaction -- "Oh man! I've got this knocked!") -- as I say, I have always felt a lot of affection for prepositional phrases, and now, because of all you know about prepositions, you are my Preposition Hero.

    Allow me to sing a chanson des prépositions in your honor:

    ♫ Over!
    Under! ♪
    ♪ Around and
    through! ♬
    Sunny days chasin' the clouds away ...

  8. #48
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I think dragn is confirming your point, demonstrating that even the apparent exceptions (such as "at Peoria") are not exceptions -- for the exact reason that you adduce here.

    I have to say, PROESL, that I have always been fond of prepositional phrases since the day I saw the point instantly in the third grade -- ("The ships in the harbor (is)(are) ready to sail." See? I even remember the exact sentence! And my exact reaction -- "Oh man! I've got this knocked!") -- as I say, I have always felt a lot of affection for prepositional phrases, and now, because of all you know about prepositions, you are my Preposition Hero.

    Allow me to sing a chanson des prépositions in your honor:

    ♫ Over!
    Under! ♪
    ♪ Around and
    through! ♬
    Sunny days chasin' the clouds away ...
    Thank you so much. I'm a preposition hero. That is so good. It is a an honor.

  9. #49
    anupumh's Avatar
    anupumh is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I think dragn is confirming your point, demonstrating that even the apparent exceptions (such as "at Peoria") are not exceptions -- for the exact reason that you adduce here.

    I have to say, PROESL, that I have always been fond of prepositional phrases since the day I saw the point instantly in the third grade -- ("The ships in the harbor (is)(are) ready to sail." See? I even remember the exact sentence! And my exact reaction -- "Oh man! I've got this knocked!") -- as I say, I have always felt a lot of affection for prepositional phrases, and now, because of all you know about prepositions, you are my Preposition Hero.

    Allow me to sing a chanson des prépositions in your honor:

    ♫ Over!
    Under! ♪
    ♪ Around and
    through! ♬
    Sunny days chasin' the clouds away ...
    No wonder Ann being a music composer..LOL

  10. #50
    Ann1977 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: pls check if this is correct sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    No wonder Ann being a music composer..LOL

    LOL!

    It's not original. It's a medley --a novelty jingle plus the theme song of a famous "educational" TV show for kids.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXqMz...eature=related
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQn8K...eature=related

    It's the only song about prepositions I know, and even then I had to throw in the theme music to round it out. There's a national shortage of songs all about prepositions.


    But if anyone ever gets to be a Vowel Hero, I know a song about vowels we can honor him with!

    And the names for the comparative forms of adjectives. I know a song about that too.
    Last edited by Ann1977; 12-Oct-2009 at 13:28.

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