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Thread: when do I use?

  1. #1
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default when do I use?

    When do i use ?

    It has increased and it's increased

  2. #2
    Mister Micawber's Avatar
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    Default Re: when do I use?

    'It's increased' would normally be understood as 'it has increased'. 'It's' = 'it is' or 'it has'.

    If the following word is popularly an '-ed' verb form, we would read 'it has'; if the following word is an '-ing' verb form, an adjective or a noun, we would read 'it is'. Ambiguities exist: 'he's tired of tapdancing' could be either-- but we can usually judge from the context.

  3. #3
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default Re: when do I use?

    can you please explain it in the most simplest way possible ? please! i still dont understand

  4. #4
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default Re: when do I use?

    When do i use?

    It is increased and it has increased

    PLEASE EXPLAIN IT BY SHOWING SETENCES. tHANK YOU

  5. #5
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    Default Re: when do I use?

    First, I suggest that you slow down your posting, James. You have posted four separate threads on the same question without waiting for responses, and I don't think that you have taken time to consider my last answer.

    'Increased' can be an adjective: 'Increased stock market activity is a sign of a healthy economy'. But it does not work well in the predicate position, because 'increase' is a process that continues; so 'it's increased' I would usually read as 'it has increased'. This means that something has grown. Growth does not stop, so we use present perfect to connect it to present and future possible growth.

    'It has increased' -- the expected sentence.
    'It is increased' -- seems unusual.

    On the other hand, 'end' (finish) is a definite point in time:

    'It is ended' (finished) sounds more usual; the event is complete.
    'It has ended' -- connects the ending to the speaker's present feeling.

  6. #6
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default Re: when do I use?

    James has increased the value of the business by putting in an additional capital.



    Which of the above sentence below has the same meaning of the above sentence?



    1) The value of the business has increased by James.

    2) The value of the business is increased by James.



    The answer is Is. I think. This shows why Iím confused with when to use has and is. Another example below.



    1) James is kicked( James kicked someone)

    2) James has kicked ( James has kicked someone)



    We donít say James has kicked by john. AM I right?

    Could you give me an example on when to use class is ended and has ended in setences form? thank you very much

  7. #7
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default Re: when do I use?

    Sorry! i mean which of the setence below has the same meaning of the aboce sentence.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: when do I use?

    Neither. 'The value of the business has been increased by James.'

    James is kicked = James is kicked by someone. (James hurts.)
    James has kicked = James has kicked someone. (Someone hurts.)

  9. #9
    james_chew_84 Guest

    Default Re: when do I use?

    Why can't we say?

    The business value is increased by James since it's ok to say James is kicked = James has been kicked. I'm confuse.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: when do I use?

    It is not OK to say 'James is kicked' = 'James has been kicked'. They have different uses. The first is timeless: 'James is kicked if he speaks out of turn'. The second indicates an action sometime between an indefinite point in the past and now.

    You can construct a situation: 'the business value is increased by James each time he makes a sale'. However, I would expect it to appear in the present perfect as the ongoing result of James's salesmanship: 'the business value has been increased by James-- let's give him a bonus!'

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